Coverart for item
The Resource Virtue, happiness, knowledge : Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin, edited by David O. Brink, Susan Sauve Meyer, and Christopher Shields

Virtue, happiness, knowledge : Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin, edited by David O. Brink, Susan Sauve Meyer, and Christopher Shields

Label
Virtue, happiness, knowledge : Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin
Title
Virtue, happiness, knowledge
Title remainder
Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin
Statement of responsibility
edited by David O. Brink, Susan Sauve Meyer, and Christopher Shields
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Fifteen leading philosophers explore a set of themes from the pioneering work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin, in ancient philosophy but also in later periods and in systematic philosophy. The contributors discuss knowledge, rhetoric, freedom and practical reason, virtue and the good life, ethics and politics in Plato and Aristotle and beyond. The editors offer an introduction charting the scholarly contributions of Fine and Irwin and assessing their individual and joint impact, together with a complete bibliography of their writings."--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Dewey number
180.938
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Brink, David O.,
  • Meyer, Susan Sauvé,
  • Shields, Christopher John,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Philosophy, Ancient
Label
Virtue, happiness, knowledge : Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin, edited by David O. Brink, Susan Sauve Meyer, and Christopher Shields
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Virtue, Happiness, Knowledge: Themes from the Work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin; Copyright; Contents; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Gail Fine; Terence Irwin; The Influence of Irwin and Fine; 1: Rethinking Agreement in Plato; 1. Introduction: Varieties of 'Agreeing' (Homologein, Homologia); 2. Two Texts Where Much Hangs on the Implications of Homologein; 2.1; 2.2; 3. Texts Where Homologein Does Not Report Any Matching Belief; 3.1; 3.2; 3.3; 4. Implications for Interpreting Socratic Questioning; 5. Confrontation Rather Than Consensus?
  • 6. Homologein as Declaring, and as Promising: Similarities and Differences7. Conclusion; References; 2: Plato's Theory of Knowledge; 0. Introduction; 1. Plato's Contextualism; 2. Adherence, Indefeasibility, and the a Priori; 3. Necessity, Safety, and the Forms; 4. Explanation and the Levels of Knowledge; 5. Cognitive Terms in Context; References; 3: Justice and Persuasion in the Republic; 1. Three Ways of Arguing for the Value of Justice; 2. Questions about the Audience; [a] The Longer Route; [b] The Shorter Route; [c] The Middle Route; [I] The Defence of Philosopher-Rulers in Books V-VI
  • [II] The Ethical Middle RouteReferences; 4: Plato against Democracy: A Defense; 1. Preliminaries; 2. What is Plato's Critique?; 3. The Ubiquity of Hierarchies; 4. A Thought Experiment: Restricting the Franchise; 5. Democracy and Aristocracy; 6. A Realistic Utopia; 7. Democracy and Fairness; 8. Aristotle and the Wisdom of Crowds; 9. Condorcet, Galton, and Surowiecki; 10. Impersonal Good and Ethical Insight; 11. Conclusion; Bibliography; 5: Self-Mastery and Self-Rule in Plato's Laws; Victory, Conflict, and Self-Mastery; Does Virtue Allow for Conflict?
  • Does Reason's 'Victory' Eliminate Internal Conflict?The Persistence of the CONFLICT Model; Conclusion; References; 6: Plato's Philebus and the Value of Idle Pleasure; I. Idle Pleasure; II. The Philebus; III. Appetite and Pleasure; IV. True Pleasure; V. True Pleasures and Value; VI. The Value of Idle Pleasure; Bibliography; 7: A Series of Goods; I. Good, Better, Best; II. A Complicated Simple Argument in Nicomachean Ethics i 6; III. Series, Before, and After; IV. A Conjectural Reconstruction; V. Conclusions; References; 8: Practical Truth: An Interpretation of Parts of NE VI
  • 1. Two Styles of Interpretation2. A 3rd Way Reading of 1139a17-b5; 3. Two-Component Accounts and Other Alternatives; 4. Some Relevant Texts in NE VI; 5. Conclusions; Bibliography; 9: Aristotelian Feelings in the Rhetoric; 1. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Rhetoric; 2. Indexical Insight; 3. Linking the Feelings: Fear and Sympathy; 4. Neutrality of the Feelings; 5. Feelings and the Desire for Action; 6. Becoming Good; 7. Aristotelian Feelings, Hobbesian Passions; Conclusion; References; 10: 'Ought' in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics; Bibliography
Control code
on1042074485
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780192549372
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1042074485
Label
Virtue, happiness, knowledge : Themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin, edited by David O. Brink, Susan Sauve Meyer, and Christopher Shields
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Virtue, Happiness, Knowledge: Themes from the Work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin; Copyright; Contents; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Gail Fine; Terence Irwin; The Influence of Irwin and Fine; 1: Rethinking Agreement in Plato; 1. Introduction: Varieties of 'Agreeing' (Homologein, Homologia); 2. Two Texts Where Much Hangs on the Implications of Homologein; 2.1; 2.2; 3. Texts Where Homologein Does Not Report Any Matching Belief; 3.1; 3.2; 3.3; 4. Implications for Interpreting Socratic Questioning; 5. Confrontation Rather Than Consensus?
  • 6. Homologein as Declaring, and as Promising: Similarities and Differences7. Conclusion; References; 2: Plato's Theory of Knowledge; 0. Introduction; 1. Plato's Contextualism; 2. Adherence, Indefeasibility, and the a Priori; 3. Necessity, Safety, and the Forms; 4. Explanation and the Levels of Knowledge; 5. Cognitive Terms in Context; References; 3: Justice and Persuasion in the Republic; 1. Three Ways of Arguing for the Value of Justice; 2. Questions about the Audience; [a] The Longer Route; [b] The Shorter Route; [c] The Middle Route; [I] The Defence of Philosopher-Rulers in Books V-VI
  • [II] The Ethical Middle RouteReferences; 4: Plato against Democracy: A Defense; 1. Preliminaries; 2. What is Plato's Critique?; 3. The Ubiquity of Hierarchies; 4. A Thought Experiment: Restricting the Franchise; 5. Democracy and Aristocracy; 6. A Realistic Utopia; 7. Democracy and Fairness; 8. Aristotle and the Wisdom of Crowds; 9. Condorcet, Galton, and Surowiecki; 10. Impersonal Good and Ethical Insight; 11. Conclusion; Bibliography; 5: Self-Mastery and Self-Rule in Plato's Laws; Victory, Conflict, and Self-Mastery; Does Virtue Allow for Conflict?
  • Does Reason's 'Victory' Eliminate Internal Conflict?The Persistence of the CONFLICT Model; Conclusion; References; 6: Plato's Philebus and the Value of Idle Pleasure; I. Idle Pleasure; II. The Philebus; III. Appetite and Pleasure; IV. True Pleasure; V. True Pleasures and Value; VI. The Value of Idle Pleasure; Bibliography; 7: A Series of Goods; I. Good, Better, Best; II. A Complicated Simple Argument in Nicomachean Ethics i 6; III. Series, Before, and After; IV. A Conjectural Reconstruction; V. Conclusions; References; 8: Practical Truth: An Interpretation of Parts of NE VI
  • 1. Two Styles of Interpretation2. A 3rd Way Reading of 1139a17-b5; 3. Two-Component Accounts and Other Alternatives; 4. Some Relevant Texts in NE VI; 5. Conclusions; Bibliography; 9: Aristotelian Feelings in the Rhetoric; 1. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Rhetoric; 2. Indexical Insight; 3. Linking the Feelings: Fear and Sympathy; 4. Neutrality of the Feelings; 5. Feelings and the Desire for Action; 6. Becoming Good; 7. Aristotelian Feelings, Hobbesian Passions; Conclusion; References; 10: 'Ought' in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics; Bibliography
Control code
on1042074485
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780192549372
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1042074485

Library Locations

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