Coverart for item
The Resource Victimization : select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Joanne Tilley, editor

Victimization : select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Joanne Tilley, editor

Label
Victimization : select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics
Title
Victimization
Title remainder
select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics
Statement of responsibility
Joanne Tilley, editor
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The Bureau of Justice Statistics' (BJS) National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is an annual data collection designed to gather information about nonfatal personal crimes and household property crimes in the United States. The main purpose of the NCVS is to accurately measure the number and type of criminal victimizations that occur each year to persons age 12 or older. Victimization rates are most commonly used in NCVS reports to describe changes in the level of personal and household crime over time and the levels of crime experienced by different population subgroups. However, prevalence
Member of
Dewey number
362.88
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
  • statistics
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Tilley, Joanne,
Series statement
Social issues, justice and status
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Victims of crimes
Label
Victimization : select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Joanne Tilley, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • VICTIMIZATION: SELECT REPORTS FROM THE BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS; VICTIMIZATION: SELECT REPORTS FROM THE BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS; Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data; CONTENTS; PREFACE; Chapter 1: CRIMINAL VICTIMIZATION, 2012; HIGHLIGHTS; METHODOLOGY; Chapter 2: MEASURING THE PREVALENCE OF CRIME WITH THE NATIONAL CRIME VICTIMIZATION SURVEY; INTRODUCTION; DEFINING VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES; THE VALUE OF MEASURING VICTIMIZATION RISK USING DIFFERENT RATES; VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR PERSONAL VIOLENCE: 1993-2010
  • VIOLENT VICTIMIZATION AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR SELECTED SUBGROUPS AND TYPES OF VIOLENCE DURING 2010VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR HOUSEHOLD PROPERTY CRIME: 1993-2010; SUMMARY; METHODOLOGY; WEIGHTING ADJUSTMENTS FOR ESTIMATING VICTIMIZATION; STANDARD ERROR COMPUTATIONS; METHODOLOGICAL CHANGES TO THE NCVS IN 2006; REFERENCES; Chapter 3: VICTIMS OF IDENTITY THEFT, 2012; FOR 85% OF IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMS, THE MOST RECENT INCIDENT INVOLVED THE UNAUTHORIZED USE OF AN EXISTING ACCOUNT
  • Persons in households with higher annual incomes were more likely to experience identity theft than persons in lower-income householdsthe most common way victims discovered the identity theft was from contact by a financial institution about a problem; the majority of identity theft victims did not know how the offender obtained their information; 9 in 10 identity theft victims did not know anything about the offender; two-thirds of identity theft victims reported a direct financial loss; in 2012, 14% of identity theft victims suffered an out-of-pocket financial loss
  • Victims of identity theft who experienced existing account misuse were the least likely to have credit-related problemsidentity theft victims were less likely than violent crime victims to have significant school, work, or relationship problems as a result of the crime; the majority of identity theft victims spent a day or less resolving associated financial and credit problems; the level of emotional distress victims experienced was related to the length of time they spent resolving problems; fewer than 1 in 10 identity theft victims reported the incident to police
  • OF THE 9% OF IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMS WHO CONTACTED A CREDIT BUREAU, 7 IN 10 PLACED A FRAUD ALERT ON THEIR CREDIT REPORTABOUT 85% OF PERSONS TOOK SOME ACTION TO PREVENT IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMIZATION; METHODOLOGY; Chapter 4: INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: ATTRIBUTES OF VICTIMIZATION,1993-2011; FROM 1994 TO 2011, THE RATE OF SERIOUS INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST MALES DECLINED BY 64%; IN 2002-11, NONFATAL SERIOUS VIOLENCE COMPRISED MORE THAN A THIRD OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE EXPERIENCED BY FEMALES AND MALES
Control code
ocn874162815
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781631173059
Level of compression
unknown
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)874162815
Label
Victimization : select reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Joanne Tilley, editor
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • VICTIMIZATION: SELECT REPORTS FROM THE BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS; VICTIMIZATION: SELECT REPORTS FROM THE BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS; Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data; CONTENTS; PREFACE; Chapter 1: CRIMINAL VICTIMIZATION, 2012; HIGHLIGHTS; METHODOLOGY; Chapter 2: MEASURING THE PREVALENCE OF CRIME WITH THE NATIONAL CRIME VICTIMIZATION SURVEY; INTRODUCTION; DEFINING VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES; THE VALUE OF MEASURING VICTIMIZATION RISK USING DIFFERENT RATES; VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR PERSONAL VIOLENCE: 1993-2010
  • VIOLENT VICTIMIZATION AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR SELECTED SUBGROUPS AND TYPES OF VIOLENCE DURING 2010VICTIMIZATION RATES AND PREVALENCE RATES FOR HOUSEHOLD PROPERTY CRIME: 1993-2010; SUMMARY; METHODOLOGY; WEIGHTING ADJUSTMENTS FOR ESTIMATING VICTIMIZATION; STANDARD ERROR COMPUTATIONS; METHODOLOGICAL CHANGES TO THE NCVS IN 2006; REFERENCES; Chapter 3: VICTIMS OF IDENTITY THEFT, 2012; FOR 85% OF IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMS, THE MOST RECENT INCIDENT INVOLVED THE UNAUTHORIZED USE OF AN EXISTING ACCOUNT
  • Persons in households with higher annual incomes were more likely to experience identity theft than persons in lower-income householdsthe most common way victims discovered the identity theft was from contact by a financial institution about a problem; the majority of identity theft victims did not know how the offender obtained their information; 9 in 10 identity theft victims did not know anything about the offender; two-thirds of identity theft victims reported a direct financial loss; in 2012, 14% of identity theft victims suffered an out-of-pocket financial loss
  • Victims of identity theft who experienced existing account misuse were the least likely to have credit-related problemsidentity theft victims were less likely than violent crime victims to have significant school, work, or relationship problems as a result of the crime; the majority of identity theft victims spent a day or less resolving associated financial and credit problems; the level of emotional distress victims experienced was related to the length of time they spent resolving problems; fewer than 1 in 10 identity theft victims reported the incident to police
  • OF THE 9% OF IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMS WHO CONTACTED A CREDIT BUREAU, 7 IN 10 PLACED A FRAUD ALERT ON THEIR CREDIT REPORTABOUT 85% OF PERSONS TOOK SOME ACTION TO PREVENT IDENTITY THEFT VICTIMIZATION; METHODOLOGY; Chapter 4: INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: ATTRIBUTES OF VICTIMIZATION,1993-2011; FROM 1994 TO 2011, THE RATE OF SERIOUS INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST MALES DECLINED BY 64%; IN 2002-11, NONFATAL SERIOUS VIOLENCE COMPRISED MORE THAN A THIRD OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE EXPERIENCED BY FEMALES AND MALES
Control code
ocn874162815
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781631173059
Level of compression
unknown
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)874162815

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