Coverart for item
The Resource Unequal networks : spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city, Gwen van Eijk

Unequal networks : spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city, Gwen van Eijk

Label
Unequal networks : spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city
Title
Unequal networks
Title remainder
spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city
Statement of responsibility
Gwen van Eijk
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Van Eijk, G
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Series statement
Sustainable urban areas
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Sociology, Urban
  • Cities and towns
  • Discrimination in housing
  • Social classes
  • Sociology, Urban
  • Cities and towns.
  • Discrimination in housing.
  • Social classes.
Label
Unequal networks : spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city, Gwen van Eijk
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-349)
Contents
1. Introduction -- 1.1. Spatial segregation and the reproduction of inequality -- 1.2. Unequal networks: social capital and the exchange of resources -- 1.3. Research approach and key questions -- 1.4. Data and methodology -- 1.5. Plan of the book -- 2. The people and the places -- 2.1. The places: Hillesluis, Cool and Blijdorp -- 2.2. The people: who they are, what they do, and why they live there -- 2.3. The networks: first descriptions -- 3. How relationships are formed: connecting neighbourhood and network -- 3.1. Filling in Fischer's choice-constraint model -- 3.2. Context: meeting opportunities, setting and focus -- 3.3. Choice: categorization, identification and the homophily principle -- 3.4. Setting and identification intertwined -- 3.5. Exchanges and expectations: rules of relevancy -- 3.6. Summary: three ways to connect neighbourhood composition and networks -- 4. Bridges and brokers: access to resources -- 4.1. Social capital and network inequality -- 4.2. Measuring resource-rich networks -- 4.3. The strong-weak dichotomy: bridging ties and intersecting networks -- 4.4. The benefit of knowing brokers -- 4.5. Useful connections: sociable and setting-specific ties -- 4.6. Brokering resources: routine activities and making an effort -- 4.7. Conclusion -- 5. Sociospatial isolation and network poverty -- 5.1. The spatial aspect of social isolation -- 5.2. The localness of personal networks -- 5.3. Network poverty -- 5.4. Distinguishing locally maintained ties and locality-based ties -- 5.5. Maintaining relationships: local friends and family neighbours -- 5.6. Locality-based ties: neighbourhood associations and sharing spaces -- 5.7. Conclusion -- 6. Relationships with fellow-residents: diversity, ethnicity, otherness -- 6.1. The neighbourhood as meaningful place: diversity and stigma -- 6.2. Perceptions of diversity -- 6.3. Different forms of locality-based relationships -- 6.4. Trusted neighbours and neighbouring -- 6.5. Reading ethnicity as òtherness' -- 6.6. The bright side and downside of neighbouring -- 6.7. Conclusion -- 7. Choosing diversity: urban-seekers, taste and diversity in personal networks -- 7.1. Homophily, habitus and taste -- 7.2. Urban-seekers, gentrification and the new middle class -- 7.3. Liking diversity: what does it mean? -- 7.4. Articulations of the metropolitan habitus -- 7.5. Diversity in personal networks -- 7.6. Conclusion -- 8. The formation of personal networks: network forms, settings and social capital -- 8.1. Network formation: settings and the life-course -- 8.2. From bounded to evolving networks -- 8.3. Network forms: family-based, friend-based and mixed networks -- 8.4. Unequal networks: variations in size, variety and resources -- 8.5. Understanding social capital -- 8.6. Conclusion -- 9. Conclusion -- 9.1. Spatial segregation and the reproduction of inequality -- 9.2. The formation of unequal networks -- 9.3. Recommendations for policy and practice -- 9.4. Questions for further research -- 9.5. Epilogue: place matters -- Appendix A. Methodology: studying personal networks -- Appendix B. Fieldwork: sampling, organization, nonresponse -- Appendix C. Key features of respondents of in-depth interviews -- Appendix D. Descriptive analyses of personal networks (appendix to Section 2.3)
Control code
ocn645493407
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
352 p.
Isbn
9781607505556
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)645493407
Label
Unequal networks : spatial segregation, relationships and inequality in the city, Gwen van Eijk
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-349)
Contents
1. Introduction -- 1.1. Spatial segregation and the reproduction of inequality -- 1.2. Unequal networks: social capital and the exchange of resources -- 1.3. Research approach and key questions -- 1.4. Data and methodology -- 1.5. Plan of the book -- 2. The people and the places -- 2.1. The places: Hillesluis, Cool and Blijdorp -- 2.2. The people: who they are, what they do, and why they live there -- 2.3. The networks: first descriptions -- 3. How relationships are formed: connecting neighbourhood and network -- 3.1. Filling in Fischer's choice-constraint model -- 3.2. Context: meeting opportunities, setting and focus -- 3.3. Choice: categorization, identification and the homophily principle -- 3.4. Setting and identification intertwined -- 3.5. Exchanges and expectations: rules of relevancy -- 3.6. Summary: three ways to connect neighbourhood composition and networks -- 4. Bridges and brokers: access to resources -- 4.1. Social capital and network inequality -- 4.2. Measuring resource-rich networks -- 4.3. The strong-weak dichotomy: bridging ties and intersecting networks -- 4.4. The benefit of knowing brokers -- 4.5. Useful connections: sociable and setting-specific ties -- 4.6. Brokering resources: routine activities and making an effort -- 4.7. Conclusion -- 5. Sociospatial isolation and network poverty -- 5.1. The spatial aspect of social isolation -- 5.2. The localness of personal networks -- 5.3. Network poverty -- 5.4. Distinguishing locally maintained ties and locality-based ties -- 5.5. Maintaining relationships: local friends and family neighbours -- 5.6. Locality-based ties: neighbourhood associations and sharing spaces -- 5.7. Conclusion -- 6. Relationships with fellow-residents: diversity, ethnicity, otherness -- 6.1. The neighbourhood as meaningful place: diversity and stigma -- 6.2. Perceptions of diversity -- 6.3. Different forms of locality-based relationships -- 6.4. Trusted neighbours and neighbouring -- 6.5. Reading ethnicity as òtherness' -- 6.6. The bright side and downside of neighbouring -- 6.7. Conclusion -- 7. Choosing diversity: urban-seekers, taste and diversity in personal networks -- 7.1. Homophily, habitus and taste -- 7.2. Urban-seekers, gentrification and the new middle class -- 7.3. Liking diversity: what does it mean? -- 7.4. Articulations of the metropolitan habitus -- 7.5. Diversity in personal networks -- 7.6. Conclusion -- 8. The formation of personal networks: network forms, settings and social capital -- 8.1. Network formation: settings and the life-course -- 8.2. From bounded to evolving networks -- 8.3. Network forms: family-based, friend-based and mixed networks -- 8.4. Unequal networks: variations in size, variety and resources -- 8.5. Understanding social capital -- 8.6. Conclusion -- 9. Conclusion -- 9.1. Spatial segregation and the reproduction of inequality -- 9.2. The formation of unequal networks -- 9.3. Recommendations for policy and practice -- 9.4. Questions for further research -- 9.5. Epilogue: place matters -- Appendix A. Methodology: studying personal networks -- Appendix B. Fieldwork: sampling, organization, nonresponse -- Appendix C. Key features of respondents of in-depth interviews -- Appendix D. Descriptive analyses of personal networks (appendix to Section 2.3)
Control code
ocn645493407
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
352 p.
Isbn
9781607505556
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)645493407

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