Coverart for item
The Resource Trust in Black America : race, discrimination, and politics, Shayla C. Nunnally, (electronic resource)

Trust in Black America : race, discrimination, and politics, Shayla C. Nunnally, (electronic resource)

Label
Trust in Black America : race, discrimination, and politics
Title
Trust in Black America
Title remainder
race, discrimination, and politics
Statement of responsibility
Shayla C. Nunnally
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"The more citizens trust their government, the better democracy functions. However, African Americans have long suffered from the lack of protection by their government, and the racial discrimination they have faced breaks down their trust in democracy. Rather than promoting democracy, the United States government has, from its inception, racially discriminated against African American citizens and other racial groups, denying them equal access to citizenship and to protection of the law. Civil rights violations by ordinary citizens have also tainted social relationships between racial groups -- social relationships that should be meaningful for enhancing relations between citizens and the government at large. Thus, trust and democracy do not function in American politics in the way that they should, in large part because trust is not colour blind. Based on the premise that racial discrimination breaks down trust in a democracy, Trust in Black America examines the effect of race on African Americans' lives. Shayla Nunnally analyzes public opinion data from two national surveys to provide an updated and contemporary analysis of African Americans' political socialization, and to explore how African Americans learn about race. She argues that the uncertainty, risk, and unfairness of institutionalized racial discrimination has led African Americans to have a fundamentally different understanding of American race relations, so much so that distrust has been the basis for which race relations have been understood by African Americans. Nunnally empirically demonstrates that race and racial discrimination have broken down trust in American democracy. Shayla C. Nunnally is Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in Political Science and African American Studies at the University of Connecticut"--Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Nunnally, Shayla C
Dewey number
305.896/073
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • Trust
  • Trust
  • Political socialization
  • United States
  • United States
Label
Trust in Black America : race, discrimination, and politics, Shayla C. Nunnally, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Introduction: race, risk, and discrimination -- Explaining Blacks' (dis)trust: a theory of discriminative racial-psychological processing -- Being Black in America: racial socialization -- Trust no one: navigating race and racism -- Trusting bodies, racing trust -- The societal context -- The political context -- Conclusion: in whom do Black Americans trust? -- Appendix A: NPSS descriptive statistics of survey sample -- Appendix B: Survey sample and U.S. census quota matching
Control code
ocn774293615
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 286 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780814759318
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)774293615
Label
Trust in Black America : race, discrimination, and politics, Shayla C. Nunnally, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
Introduction: race, risk, and discrimination -- Explaining Blacks' (dis)trust: a theory of discriminative racial-psychological processing -- Being Black in America: racial socialization -- Trust no one: navigating race and racism -- Trusting bodies, racing trust -- The societal context -- The political context -- Conclusion: in whom do Black Americans trust? -- Appendix A: NPSS descriptive statistics of survey sample -- Appendix B: Survey sample and U.S. census quota matching
Control code
ocn774293615
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 286 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780814759318
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)774293615

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