Coverart for item
The Resource Translation of autobiography : narrating self, translating the other, by Susan XU Yun

Translation of autobiography : narrating self, translating the other, by Susan XU Yun

Label
Translation of autobiography : narrating self, translating the other
Title
Translation of autobiography
Title remainder
narrating self, translating the other
Statement of responsibility
by Susan XU Yun
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Xu Yun, Susan,
Dewey number
418/.0392
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Benjamins translation library BTL,
Series volume
volume 136
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Translating and interpreting
  • Translating and interpreting
  • Autobiography
  • Translating and interpreting
  • Discourse analysis, Narrative
  • Education, Bilingual
  • Singapore
Label
Translation of autobiography : narrating self, translating the other, by Susan XU Yun
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Intro -- Translation of Autobiography -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgements -- List of tables -- List of figures -- List of abbreviations -- Introduction -- 1. Aims and scope of the book -- 2. Data selection criteria -- 3. Bilingualism in Singapore -- 4. Pseudo-original and assumed translation -- 5. Translator's dilemma in Singapore -- 6. Organization of the book -- Chapter 1. Distinctiveness of autobiography: Binary oppositions and theoretical dimensions -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Distinctive features of autobiography -- 1.2.1 Autobiography and memoirs: Self or others -- 1.2.2 Autobiography and biography: Subjectivity or objectivity -- 1.2.3 Autobiography and fictive autobiography: Truth or myth -- 1.2.4 Autobiography and canonical literature: Comprehensibility or exceptionality -- 1.2.5 Autobiography and historiography: Private or public -- 1.3 Review of studies on autobiography -- 1.3.1 Shifts of critical focus -- 1.3.2 Self-making and world-making functions -- 1.3.3 Enactment and didactic role -- 1.3.4 Referential and rhetorical value of language and style -- 1.3.5 Competing voices and identity crisis in translation -- 1.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 2. Language of autobiography: Style and foregrounding -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Literariness in autobiography -- 2.2.1 Criteria of literariness -- 2.2.2 Subjective and objective language -- 2.3 Stylistic analytical framework -- 2.3.1 Foregrounding and familiarization -- 2.3.2 Checklist of linguistic and stylistic categories -- 2.3.3 Functional grammar and transitivity -- 2.3.4 Linguistic criticism -- 2.3.5 Integrated model of stylistic analysis -- 2.4 Foregrounding analysis of Challenge -- 2.4.1 Lexical categories: Underlexicalization -- 2.4.2 Syntactic categories: Contrast -- 2.4.3 Figures of speech: Subtlety
  • 2.4.4 Context and cohesion: Enhancement of coherence -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 3. Point of view in autobiography: Character, narrator and implied author -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Narrative-communicative situation -- 3.2.1 Levels of analysis -- 3.2.2 Narrative-communicative situation -- 3.3 Implied author, narrator and character relationship in autobiography -- 3.3.1 Implied author ≠ real author -- 3.3.2 I-narrator ≠ implied author -- 3.3.3 I-character ≠ I-narrator -- 3.3.4 Hypothetical narrative structure in autobiography -- 3.4 Point of view theories -- 3.4.1 Psychological aspects: Internal and external perspectives -- 3.4.2 Visual aspects: Focalization -- 3.4.3 Ideological aspects: Slant and filter -- 3.4.4 Linguistic aspects: Mind style -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 4. Narrating and experiencing self: Mimesis within diegesis -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Constituting consciousness -- 4.3 Deixis, modality and speech/thought presentation -- 4.3.1 Deixis and reader's consciousness -- 4.3.2 Modality and the speaker's consciousness -- 4.3.3 Speech and thought presentation: The narrator's/character's consciousness -- 4.4 Character's consciousness: The mimesis -- 4.4.1 DS -- 4.4.2 FIS -- 4.4.3 DT and FIT -- 4.5 Narrator's consciousness: The diegesis -- 4.5.1 NRSA and NRTA -- 4.5.2 IS and IT -- 4.5.3 Paradoxical FDT -- 4.6 Interplay between character and narrator -- 4.6.1 Empathy -- 4.6.2 Irony -- 4.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 5. Implied translator: The "other" voice in translation and rewriting -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The implied translator and the "other" voice -- 5.3 Rewriting -- 5.3.1 Narratorial differences -- 5.3.2 Poetics and patronage in rewriting -- 5.4 Foregrounding and transitivity in Type I texts -- 5.4.1 Overlexicalization -- 5.4.2 Syntactic foreignness -- 5.4.3 Circumlocution and overevaluation -- 5.4.4 Incoherence
  • 5.5 The "other" voice in Type III texts -- 5.5.1 Faithful translator with "passive" voice -- 5.5.2 Skilful translator with "active" voice -- 5.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 6. Translating the "other": Unreliable narrator and discordant voice -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 The "other" consciousness in translated narrative -- 6.3 Fallible filter, unreliable narrator and discordant narration -- 6.4 Fallible filters and translator-conscious irony -- 6.4.1 Irony and empathy retained -- 6.4.2 Irony and empathy created -- 6.4.3 Irony and empathy erased -- 6.5 Unreliable narrator and translator-unconscious irony -- 6.5.1 Factual discrepancy -- 6.5.2 Attitudinal inconsistence -- 6.5.3 Ideological discordance -- 6.6 Conclusion -- Conclusion -- 1. Seeing the point and hearing the voices -- 2. Towards a multidisciplinary and transnational framework -- 3. Final remarks -- Author queries -- Index -- Index (Chinese)
Control code
on1003489485
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 230 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027265104
Lccn
2017043308
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1003489485
Label
Translation of autobiography : narrating self, translating the other, by Susan XU Yun
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Intro -- Translation of Autobiography -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgements -- List of tables -- List of figures -- List of abbreviations -- Introduction -- 1. Aims and scope of the book -- 2. Data selection criteria -- 3. Bilingualism in Singapore -- 4. Pseudo-original and assumed translation -- 5. Translator's dilemma in Singapore -- 6. Organization of the book -- Chapter 1. Distinctiveness of autobiography: Binary oppositions and theoretical dimensions -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Distinctive features of autobiography -- 1.2.1 Autobiography and memoirs: Self or others -- 1.2.2 Autobiography and biography: Subjectivity or objectivity -- 1.2.3 Autobiography and fictive autobiography: Truth or myth -- 1.2.4 Autobiography and canonical literature: Comprehensibility or exceptionality -- 1.2.5 Autobiography and historiography: Private or public -- 1.3 Review of studies on autobiography -- 1.3.1 Shifts of critical focus -- 1.3.2 Self-making and world-making functions -- 1.3.3 Enactment and didactic role -- 1.3.4 Referential and rhetorical value of language and style -- 1.3.5 Competing voices and identity crisis in translation -- 1.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 2. Language of autobiography: Style and foregrounding -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Literariness in autobiography -- 2.2.1 Criteria of literariness -- 2.2.2 Subjective and objective language -- 2.3 Stylistic analytical framework -- 2.3.1 Foregrounding and familiarization -- 2.3.2 Checklist of linguistic and stylistic categories -- 2.3.3 Functional grammar and transitivity -- 2.3.4 Linguistic criticism -- 2.3.5 Integrated model of stylistic analysis -- 2.4 Foregrounding analysis of Challenge -- 2.4.1 Lexical categories: Underlexicalization -- 2.4.2 Syntactic categories: Contrast -- 2.4.3 Figures of speech: Subtlety
  • 2.4.4 Context and cohesion: Enhancement of coherence -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 3. Point of view in autobiography: Character, narrator and implied author -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Narrative-communicative situation -- 3.2.1 Levels of analysis -- 3.2.2 Narrative-communicative situation -- 3.3 Implied author, narrator and character relationship in autobiography -- 3.3.1 Implied author ≠ real author -- 3.3.2 I-narrator ≠ implied author -- 3.3.3 I-character ≠ I-narrator -- 3.3.4 Hypothetical narrative structure in autobiography -- 3.4 Point of view theories -- 3.4.1 Psychological aspects: Internal and external perspectives -- 3.4.2 Visual aspects: Focalization -- 3.4.3 Ideological aspects: Slant and filter -- 3.4.4 Linguistic aspects: Mind style -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 4. Narrating and experiencing self: Mimesis within diegesis -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Constituting consciousness -- 4.3 Deixis, modality and speech/thought presentation -- 4.3.1 Deixis and reader's consciousness -- 4.3.2 Modality and the speaker's consciousness -- 4.3.3 Speech and thought presentation: The narrator's/character's consciousness -- 4.4 Character's consciousness: The mimesis -- 4.4.1 DS -- 4.4.2 FIS -- 4.4.3 DT and FIT -- 4.5 Narrator's consciousness: The diegesis -- 4.5.1 NRSA and NRTA -- 4.5.2 IS and IT -- 4.5.3 Paradoxical FDT -- 4.6 Interplay between character and narrator -- 4.6.1 Empathy -- 4.6.2 Irony -- 4.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 5. Implied translator: The "other" voice in translation and rewriting -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The implied translator and the "other" voice -- 5.3 Rewriting -- 5.3.1 Narratorial differences -- 5.3.2 Poetics and patronage in rewriting -- 5.4 Foregrounding and transitivity in Type I texts -- 5.4.1 Overlexicalization -- 5.4.2 Syntactic foreignness -- 5.4.3 Circumlocution and overevaluation -- 5.4.4 Incoherence
  • 5.5 The "other" voice in Type III texts -- 5.5.1 Faithful translator with "passive" voice -- 5.5.2 Skilful translator with "active" voice -- 5.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 6. Translating the "other": Unreliable narrator and discordant voice -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 The "other" consciousness in translated narrative -- 6.3 Fallible filter, unreliable narrator and discordant narration -- 6.4 Fallible filters and translator-conscious irony -- 6.4.1 Irony and empathy retained -- 6.4.2 Irony and empathy created -- 6.4.3 Irony and empathy erased -- 6.5 Unreliable narrator and translator-unconscious irony -- 6.5.1 Factual discrepancy -- 6.5.2 Attitudinal inconsistence -- 6.5.3 Ideological discordance -- 6.6 Conclusion -- Conclusion -- 1. Seeing the point and hearing the voices -- 2. Towards a multidisciplinary and transnational framework -- 3. Final remarks -- Author queries -- Index -- Index (Chinese)
Control code
on1003489485
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 230 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027265104
Lccn
2017043308
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1003489485

Library Locations

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