Coverart for item
The Resource The punitive society : lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973, Michel Foucault ; edited by Bernard E. Harcourt ; general editors : François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by Graham Burchell

The punitive society : lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973, Michel Foucault ; edited by Bernard E. Harcourt ; general editors : François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by Graham Burchell

Label
The punitive society : lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973
Title
The punitive society
Title remainder
lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973
Statement of responsibility
Michel Foucault ; edited by Bernard E. Harcourt ; general editors : François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by Graham Burchell
Title variation
Michel Foucault the punitive society
Creator
Contributor
Author
Editor
Host institution
Translator
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1926-1984
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Foucault, Michel
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1963-
  • 1939-2013
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Harcourt, Bernard E.
  • Ewald, François
  • Fontana, Alessandro
  • Burchell, Graham
  • Collège de France
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Social control
  • Punishment
Label
The punitive society : lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973, Michel Foucault ; edited by Bernard E. Harcourt ; general editors : François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by Graham Burchell
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Translated from the French title "Société punitive"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • compensation
  • Links with the development of capitalism
  • 3.
  • The coercive as prison's condition of acceptability
  • Seven.
  • 14 February 1973
  • (A).
  • England (continued). The great rise of virtues
  • (B).
  • France. Appearance of new techniques of removal and confinement. In France, investment of State apparatus by lateral social interest: lettres de cachet, a means of social control that produces moralization and psychologization of the penalty in the nineteenth century. Capillary counter-investment of associations, families, and [ect.]
  • Eight.
  • 3.
  • 21 February 1973
  • (B).
  • France (continued). Recapitulation and outcome: the punitive society. Mechanism: control of lower-class or popular illegalism (illegalisme populaire)
  • 1.
  • Popular illegalism in the eighteenth century. The case of the Maine weavers. Merchants and weavers circumvent the regulations. The positive functioning of illegalisms
  • 2.
  • Reversal at the end of the eighteenth century. The bourgeoisie seizes the judicial apparatus in order to get rid of lower-class illegalism now become "depredation." Worker depredation; plunder by workers in the Port of London
  • 3.
  • Organization of the penal and penitentiary system. Instruments: the notion of social enemy; moralization of the working class; prison, colony, army, police. In the nineteenth century, worker illegalism, target of the whole repressive system of the bourgeoisie
  • Nine.
  • marking
  • 28 February 1973
  • (B).
  • France (continued). Pinning the moral on the penal
  • 4.
  • Peasant depredation: in the eighteenth century, illegalism as functional element of peasant life; end of eighteenth century, abolition of feudal rights; nineteenth century, tighter exploitation. The case of the exploitation of forests. New illegalism against the contract; challenge and civil dispute
  • 5.
  • Consequences
  • (i).
  • The Army as source and exchanger of illegalisms
  • (ii).
  • 4.
  • Illegalism as the stake of the Revolution
  • (iii).
  • A Massive and programmed bourgeois response: the "lower class" as "degenerate class." The new character of the delinquent: wild, immoral, but can be regenerated by superintendence
  • Ten.
  • 7 March 1973
  • (I).
  • Fear at the start of the nineteenth century
  • 1.
  • Linked to the new modes of production; a fear of the worker, of his desire and his body
  • 2.
  • confinement
  • Grounded in reality
  • 3.
  • Fear of the laboring class; 4. of the fact that "they" do not work enough. Threat to the capitalist apparatus. The penal system is directed at the worker's body, desire, and need. Double requirement: free market and discipline. The worker's record book (livret)
  • (II).
  • Penal dualism: the double front of penality
  • 1.
  • Recodification of crimes and penalties: homogeneous, positive, constraining, representative, effective
  • 2.
  • Integration of a moral conditioning: aggravating and extenuating circumstances; supervision; reformatories; re-education. Law-correction duality. Criminology: a discourse that ensures the transcription of this duality. Monomania
  • Eleven.
  • (II).
  • 14 MARCH 1973
  • (I).
  • New illegalism: from depredation to dissipation. Refusing one's labor-power. The worker's body as dominant factor: idleness; refusal to work; irregularity; nomadism; festivity; refusal of family; debauchery
  • (A).
  • History of laziness. Classical idleness of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; collective and organized refusal in the nineteenth century
  • (B).
  • Characteristics of this dissipation: reciprocal reinforcement of illegalisms; collective and easy to spread; infra-legal; profitable to the bourgeoisie; object of disapproval. The three forms of dissipation: intemperance, improvidence, disorderliness. The three institutions of dissipation: festivity, lottery, [ect.]
  • (II).
  • Controlling dissipation. Para-penal mechanisms; savings book; worker's record book. Graduated, continuous, and accumulative system
  • (III).
  • Establishing the autonomy of the level of penal tactics
  • Continuity and capillarization of justice in everyday life. General supervision. Examination form. The supervision-punishment couple. Disciplinary society
  • Twelve.
  • 21 March 1973
  • (I).
  • The institutions of confinement: pedagogical, corrective, therapeutic. Architectural and micro-sociological research
  • (II).
  • Analysis of these institutions. (A) New form of confinement-sequestration. Three differences from the classical age
  • 1.
  • Form of hyper-power
  • 2.
  • 1.
  • Normalization
  • 3.
  • Intra-State system
  • (B).
  • The functions of sequestration. The sequestration of time. Subjection of the time of life to the time of production
  • 2.
  • Direct or indirect control of entire existence. Fabrication of the social
  • 3.
  • Permanent and uninterrupted judgment
  • 4.
  • Situating them within the sphere of power
  • Production of a new type of discursivity: daily moral accounting of entire existence; ordered by reference to the normal and the abnormal
  • Thirteen.
  • 28 March 1973
  • (I).
  • General analysis of power. Four schemas to be rejected
  • 1.
  • Appropriation: power is not possessed, it is exercised. The case of worker saving
  • 2.
  • Localization: power is not strictly localized in the State apparatuses, but is much more deep rooted. The case of police in the eighteenth century and of the penal in the nineteenth century
  • 3.
  • 2.
  • Subordination: power does not guarantee, but constitutes modes of production. The case of sequestration
  • 4.
  • Ideology: the exercise of power is not the site of the formation of ideology, but of knowledge; all knowledge makes possible the exercise of a power. The case of administrative survey (surveillance)
  • (II).
  • Analysis of disciplinary power: normalization, habit, discipline. Comparison of the use of the term "habit" in the philosophy of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Comparison of power-sovereignty in the eighteenth century and power-normalization in the nineteenth century
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Examining political struggles and disputes around power
  • Two.
  • 10 January 1973
  • 1.
  • The constant, universal war internal to society
  • 2.
  • A Penal system that is neither universal nor univocal, but made by some for others
  • 3.
  • The Structure of universal superintendence (surveillance)
  • 4.
  • One.
  • A System of confinement
  • (I).
  • The content of the notion of civil war
  • (A).
  • Civil war as resurgence of the war of all against all, according to Hobbes
  • (B).
  • Distinction between civil war and war of all against all. New groups; examples of the Nu-pieds and the Luddite movement
  • (C).
  • Politics as continuation of civil war
  • (II).
  • 3 January 1973
  • The criminal's status as social enemy
  • Three.
  • 17 January 1973
  • (I).
  • Economic analysis of delinquency in the eighteenth century by the physiocrats. Le Trosne, Memoire sur les vagabonds (1764): More than a psychological propensity like idleness or a social phenomenon like begging, vagabondage is the matrix of crime and a scourge of the economy; it produces scarcity of labor, raises wages, and lowers [ect.]
  • 1.
  • enslavement
  • 2.
  • outlawing
  • 3.
  • (I).
  • Peasant Self-defense
  • 4.
  • Mass Conscription
  • (II).
  • The criminal-social enemy as literary theme. Gil Blas and the beginning of the eighteenth century: the continuum and omnipresence of delinquency. Novels of terror at the end of the eighteenth century: localized and extra-social delinquency. Emergence of the dualities crime-innocence, evil-good
  • Four.
  • 24 January 1973
  • (III).
  • Other signs of the emergence of the criminal-social enemy. Debate on the death penalty in 1791
  • (IV).
  • The four penal tactics
  • Relationship between the theoretical-political effects of a discourse and punitive tactics in the same period. Main system of punishment: in England, organization of penitentiary system in 1790--1800; in France, 1791--1821. Heterogeneity of criminal-social enemy and the prison: rift between the penal and the [ect.]
  • Five.
  • 31 January 1973
  • (A).
  • The monastic cell: to exclude the world, and not to punish
  • (B).
  • The Quakers: rejection of the English penal code and of the death penalty. Opposition to Beccaria concerning infraction and wrongdoing; the conception of sin
  • (C).
  • Organization of the prison of Philadelphia and of Walnut Street: first mention of the "penitentiary (penitentier)."
  • (D).
  • 1.
  • Consequences
  • 1.
  • Grafting of Christian morality on criminal justice
  • 2.
  • Knowledge (connaissance) of the prisoner: a form of knowledge (savoir) becomes possible
  • 3.
  • Religion Invests the prison. Progressive re-Christianization of crime
  • Six.
  • 7 February 1973
  • (I).
  • exclusion
  • The generalization and conditions of acceptability of the prison-form
  • (A).
  • England. Spontaneous groups for ensuring order
  • 1.
  • Quakers and Methodists
  • 2.
  • Societies for the suppression of vice
  • 3.
  • Self-defense groups
  • 4.
  • 2.
  • Private police
  • 1.
  • Morality as foundation of the penal system
  • 2.
  • Need for State-police
  • 3.
  • Police target the lower classes. Conclusions
  • 1.
  • State as agent of morality
  • 2.
Control code
ocn904194512
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xix, 320 pages
Isbn
9781403986603
Isbn Type
hardcover
Lccn
2015003226
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)904194512
Label
The punitive society : lectures at the Collège de France 1972-1973, Michel Foucault ; edited by Bernard E. Harcourt ; general editors : François Ewald and Alessandro Fontana ; translated by Graham Burchell
Publication
Copyright
Note
Translated from the French title "Société punitive"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • compensation
  • Links with the development of capitalism
  • 3.
  • The coercive as prison's condition of acceptability
  • Seven.
  • 14 February 1973
  • (A).
  • England (continued). The great rise of virtues
  • (B).
  • France. Appearance of new techniques of removal and confinement. In France, investment of State apparatus by lateral social interest: lettres de cachet, a means of social control that produces moralization and psychologization of the penalty in the nineteenth century. Capillary counter-investment of associations, families, and [ect.]
  • Eight.
  • 3.
  • 21 February 1973
  • (B).
  • France (continued). Recapitulation and outcome: the punitive society. Mechanism: control of lower-class or popular illegalism (illegalisme populaire)
  • 1.
  • Popular illegalism in the eighteenth century. The case of the Maine weavers. Merchants and weavers circumvent the regulations. The positive functioning of illegalisms
  • 2.
  • Reversal at the end of the eighteenth century. The bourgeoisie seizes the judicial apparatus in order to get rid of lower-class illegalism now become "depredation." Worker depredation; plunder by workers in the Port of London
  • 3.
  • Organization of the penal and penitentiary system. Instruments: the notion of social enemy; moralization of the working class; prison, colony, army, police. In the nineteenth century, worker illegalism, target of the whole repressive system of the bourgeoisie
  • Nine.
  • marking
  • 28 February 1973
  • (B).
  • France (continued). Pinning the moral on the penal
  • 4.
  • Peasant depredation: in the eighteenth century, illegalism as functional element of peasant life; end of eighteenth century, abolition of feudal rights; nineteenth century, tighter exploitation. The case of the exploitation of forests. New illegalism against the contract; challenge and civil dispute
  • 5.
  • Consequences
  • (i).
  • The Army as source and exchanger of illegalisms
  • (ii).
  • 4.
  • Illegalism as the stake of the Revolution
  • (iii).
  • A Massive and programmed bourgeois response: the "lower class" as "degenerate class." The new character of the delinquent: wild, immoral, but can be regenerated by superintendence
  • Ten.
  • 7 March 1973
  • (I).
  • Fear at the start of the nineteenth century
  • 1.
  • Linked to the new modes of production; a fear of the worker, of his desire and his body
  • 2.
  • confinement
  • Grounded in reality
  • 3.
  • Fear of the laboring class; 4. of the fact that "they" do not work enough. Threat to the capitalist apparatus. The penal system is directed at the worker's body, desire, and need. Double requirement: free market and discipline. The worker's record book (livret)
  • (II).
  • Penal dualism: the double front of penality
  • 1.
  • Recodification of crimes and penalties: homogeneous, positive, constraining, representative, effective
  • 2.
  • Integration of a moral conditioning: aggravating and extenuating circumstances; supervision; reformatories; re-education. Law-correction duality. Criminology: a discourse that ensures the transcription of this duality. Monomania
  • Eleven.
  • (II).
  • 14 MARCH 1973
  • (I).
  • New illegalism: from depredation to dissipation. Refusing one's labor-power. The worker's body as dominant factor: idleness; refusal to work; irregularity; nomadism; festivity; refusal of family; debauchery
  • (A).
  • History of laziness. Classical idleness of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; collective and organized refusal in the nineteenth century
  • (B).
  • Characteristics of this dissipation: reciprocal reinforcement of illegalisms; collective and easy to spread; infra-legal; profitable to the bourgeoisie; object of disapproval. The three forms of dissipation: intemperance, improvidence, disorderliness. The three institutions of dissipation: festivity, lottery, [ect.]
  • (II).
  • Controlling dissipation. Para-penal mechanisms; savings book; worker's record book. Graduated, continuous, and accumulative system
  • (III).
  • Establishing the autonomy of the level of penal tactics
  • Continuity and capillarization of justice in everyday life. General supervision. Examination form. The supervision-punishment couple. Disciplinary society
  • Twelve.
  • 21 March 1973
  • (I).
  • The institutions of confinement: pedagogical, corrective, therapeutic. Architectural and micro-sociological research
  • (II).
  • Analysis of these institutions. (A) New form of confinement-sequestration. Three differences from the classical age
  • 1.
  • Form of hyper-power
  • 2.
  • 1.
  • Normalization
  • 3.
  • Intra-State system
  • (B).
  • The functions of sequestration. The sequestration of time. Subjection of the time of life to the time of production
  • 2.
  • Direct or indirect control of entire existence. Fabrication of the social
  • 3.
  • Permanent and uninterrupted judgment
  • 4.
  • Situating them within the sphere of power
  • Production of a new type of discursivity: daily moral accounting of entire existence; ordered by reference to the normal and the abnormal
  • Thirteen.
  • 28 March 1973
  • (I).
  • General analysis of power. Four schemas to be rejected
  • 1.
  • Appropriation: power is not possessed, it is exercised. The case of worker saving
  • 2.
  • Localization: power is not strictly localized in the State apparatuses, but is much more deep rooted. The case of police in the eighteenth century and of the penal in the nineteenth century
  • 3.
  • 2.
  • Subordination: power does not guarantee, but constitutes modes of production. The case of sequestration
  • 4.
  • Ideology: the exercise of power is not the site of the formation of ideology, but of knowledge; all knowledge makes possible the exercise of a power. The case of administrative survey (surveillance)
  • (II).
  • Analysis of disciplinary power: normalization, habit, discipline. Comparison of the use of the term "habit" in the philosophy of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Comparison of power-sovereignty in the eighteenth century and power-normalization in the nineteenth century
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Examining political struggles and disputes around power
  • Two.
  • 10 January 1973
  • 1.
  • The constant, universal war internal to society
  • 2.
  • A Penal system that is neither universal nor univocal, but made by some for others
  • 3.
  • The Structure of universal superintendence (surveillance)
  • 4.
  • One.
  • A System of confinement
  • (I).
  • The content of the notion of civil war
  • (A).
  • Civil war as resurgence of the war of all against all, according to Hobbes
  • (B).
  • Distinction between civil war and war of all against all. New groups; examples of the Nu-pieds and the Luddite movement
  • (C).
  • Politics as continuation of civil war
  • (II).
  • 3 January 1973
  • The criminal's status as social enemy
  • Three.
  • 17 January 1973
  • (I).
  • Economic analysis of delinquency in the eighteenth century by the physiocrats. Le Trosne, Memoire sur les vagabonds (1764): More than a psychological propensity like idleness or a social phenomenon like begging, vagabondage is the matrix of crime and a scourge of the economy; it produces scarcity of labor, raises wages, and lowers [ect.]
  • 1.
  • enslavement
  • 2.
  • outlawing
  • 3.
  • (I).
  • Peasant Self-defense
  • 4.
  • Mass Conscription
  • (II).
  • The criminal-social enemy as literary theme. Gil Blas and the beginning of the eighteenth century: the continuum and omnipresence of delinquency. Novels of terror at the end of the eighteenth century: localized and extra-social delinquency. Emergence of the dualities crime-innocence, evil-good
  • Four.
  • 24 January 1973
  • (III).
  • Other signs of the emergence of the criminal-social enemy. Debate on the death penalty in 1791
  • (IV).
  • The four penal tactics
  • Relationship between the theoretical-political effects of a discourse and punitive tactics in the same period. Main system of punishment: in England, organization of penitentiary system in 1790--1800; in France, 1791--1821. Heterogeneity of criminal-social enemy and the prison: rift between the penal and the [ect.]
  • Five.
  • 31 January 1973
  • (A).
  • The monastic cell: to exclude the world, and not to punish
  • (B).
  • The Quakers: rejection of the English penal code and of the death penalty. Opposition to Beccaria concerning infraction and wrongdoing; the conception of sin
  • (C).
  • Organization of the prison of Philadelphia and of Walnut Street: first mention of the "penitentiary (penitentier)."
  • (D).
  • 1.
  • Consequences
  • 1.
  • Grafting of Christian morality on criminal justice
  • 2.
  • Knowledge (connaissance) of the prisoner: a form of knowledge (savoir) becomes possible
  • 3.
  • Religion Invests the prison. Progressive re-Christianization of crime
  • Six.
  • 7 February 1973
  • (I).
  • exclusion
  • The generalization and conditions of acceptability of the prison-form
  • (A).
  • England. Spontaneous groups for ensuring order
  • 1.
  • Quakers and Methodists
  • 2.
  • Societies for the suppression of vice
  • 3.
  • Self-defense groups
  • 4.
  • 2.
  • Private police
  • 1.
  • Morality as foundation of the penal system
  • 2.
  • Need for State-police
  • 3.
  • Police target the lower classes. Conclusions
  • 1.
  • State as agent of morality
  • 2.
Control code
ocn904194512
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xix, 320 pages
Isbn
9781403986603
Isbn Type
hardcover
Lccn
2015003226
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)904194512

Library Locations

    • Manawatū LibraryBorrow it
      Tennent Drive, Palmerston North, Palmerston North, 4472, NZ
      -40.385340 175.617349
Processing Feedback ...