Coverart for item
The Resource The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL, (electronic resource)

The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL, (electronic resource)

Label
The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL
Title
The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The four papers presented in this volume are corpus-based investigations into the meaning of the verbs speak, talk, say and tell. More specifically they want to explore how the scene of linguistic action has been put into perspective by these four high-frequency verbs
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dirven, René
Dewey number
400
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Goossens, Louis
  • Putseys, Yvan
  • Vorlat, Emma
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Discourse analysis
Label
The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
4. On the Fuzziness of the Frames and Other Residual Problems
Contents
  • THE SCENE OF LINGUISTIC ACTION AND ITS PERSPECTIVIZATION BY SPEAK, TALK, SAY AND TELL; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of contents; INTRODUCTION; NOTES; FRAMING THE SCENE OF LINGUISTIC ACTION BY MEANS OF"SPEAK"; 0. Introduction; 1. The Place of Speak Among Some Verbs of Communication; 1.1. Characteristics of Speak; 1.2. Further Distinctions Within the Speaking Scene; 1.3. The Participants in the Communication; 1.4. The Information Transfer; 1.4.1. The Transmission Object; 1.4.2. The Transmission Devices; 1.5. Situational Features; 1.6. Summary
  • 2. Syntactic-Semantic Analysis of Speak2.1. The Three Speaks; 2.1.1. Speak I; 2.1.2 Speak II; 2.1.3. Speak III; 2.2. The Participants; 2.2.1. The Sender; 2.2.2. The Receiver; 2.3. The Information Transfer; 2.3.1. The Transmission Object; 2.3.2. The Transmission Devices; 2.3.3. Situational Features; 2.4. Conclusion; NOTES; "TALK": LINGUISTIC ACTION PERSPECTIVIZED AS DISCOURSE; 0. Introduction; 1. General characterisation of talk as denoting discourse; 1.1. Talk vs. say; 1.2. Talk vs. tell; 1.3. Talk vs. speak; 2. Particular senses of talk in zero contexts; 2.1. Extensive linguistic action
  • 2.2. Various aspects of the linguistic action2.3. Communicative linguistic action; 3. Types of discourse participants in to- and with-phrases; 3.1. The addressee is not the receiver or he is a doubtful receiver; 3.2. The addressee is the receiver; 3.2.1. The receiver as a mere receptor; 3.2.2. The receiver as an implicit interactor; 3.2.3. The receiver as an explicit interactor; 4. Topic of the discourse and other types of topic; 4.1. Talk about; 4.2. Talk of and talk on; 4.3. Talk + direct object; 5. Adverbial constructions with talk denoting manner etc.; 5.1. Talk like that/this
  • 5.2. Talk like NP (does)5.3. Talk + way; 5.4. Talk + -ly-adverb; 5.5. Talk as if; 5.6. Talk + in NP; 6. Expression of literal and metaphorical space with talk; 6.1. Talk + literal location; 6.2. Talk + metaphorical location; 6.3. Talk 4- locative expression as a causative verb denoting a result; 6.4. Talk with the particles out and over; 7. Conclusions; NOTES; "SAY": FOCUS ON THE MESSAGE; 0. Introduction; 1. Active subject; 2. Direct object; 3. The subject of passive sentences.; 4. The referent of so, as and like.; 5. Non-nuclear constituents.; 6. Manner adverbials.; 7. 'Absolute uses'
  • 8. The meaning (s) of say.9. Postscript.; NOTES; ASPECTSOF THE LINGUISTIC ACTION SCENE WITH "TELL"; 0. Introduction; 1. The scene of the linguistic action verb tell; 1.1. Subject; 1.2. Object; 1.3. Indirect Object; 1.4. Prepositional phrases; 1.5. Adverbial Adjuncts; 2. Syntactico-semantic features of L.A.V. tell; 2.1. With Addressee; 2.1.1. INFORM-tell; a. With Message; b. INFORM-tell with Topic; 2.1.2. NARRATE-tell; 2.2. Without Addressee; 2.2.1. MAKEOUT-tell; 2.2.2. EXPRESS IN WORDS -- tell; 2.2.3. MAKE KNOWN--tell; 3. Non-Linguistic Action Verb tell; 3.1. COUNT-tell; 3.2. EFFECT-tell
Control code
ocn769342236
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (191 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027280596
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)769342236
Label
The Scene of Linguistic Action and its Perspectivization by SPEAK, TALK, SAY and TELL, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
4. On the Fuzziness of the Frames and Other Residual Problems
Contents
  • THE SCENE OF LINGUISTIC ACTION AND ITS PERSPECTIVIZATION BY SPEAK, TALK, SAY AND TELL; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of contents; INTRODUCTION; NOTES; FRAMING THE SCENE OF LINGUISTIC ACTION BY MEANS OF"SPEAK"; 0. Introduction; 1. The Place of Speak Among Some Verbs of Communication; 1.1. Characteristics of Speak; 1.2. Further Distinctions Within the Speaking Scene; 1.3. The Participants in the Communication; 1.4. The Information Transfer; 1.4.1. The Transmission Object; 1.4.2. The Transmission Devices; 1.5. Situational Features; 1.6. Summary
  • 2. Syntactic-Semantic Analysis of Speak2.1. The Three Speaks; 2.1.1. Speak I; 2.1.2 Speak II; 2.1.3. Speak III; 2.2. The Participants; 2.2.1. The Sender; 2.2.2. The Receiver; 2.3. The Information Transfer; 2.3.1. The Transmission Object; 2.3.2. The Transmission Devices; 2.3.3. Situational Features; 2.4. Conclusion; NOTES; "TALK": LINGUISTIC ACTION PERSPECTIVIZED AS DISCOURSE; 0. Introduction; 1. General characterisation of talk as denoting discourse; 1.1. Talk vs. say; 1.2. Talk vs. tell; 1.3. Talk vs. speak; 2. Particular senses of talk in zero contexts; 2.1. Extensive linguistic action
  • 2.2. Various aspects of the linguistic action2.3. Communicative linguistic action; 3. Types of discourse participants in to- and with-phrases; 3.1. The addressee is not the receiver or he is a doubtful receiver; 3.2. The addressee is the receiver; 3.2.1. The receiver as a mere receptor; 3.2.2. The receiver as an implicit interactor; 3.2.3. The receiver as an explicit interactor; 4. Topic of the discourse and other types of topic; 4.1. Talk about; 4.2. Talk of and talk on; 4.3. Talk + direct object; 5. Adverbial constructions with talk denoting manner etc.; 5.1. Talk like that/this
  • 5.2. Talk like NP (does)5.3. Talk + way; 5.4. Talk + -ly-adverb; 5.5. Talk as if; 5.6. Talk + in NP; 6. Expression of literal and metaphorical space with talk; 6.1. Talk + literal location; 6.2. Talk + metaphorical location; 6.3. Talk 4- locative expression as a causative verb denoting a result; 6.4. Talk with the particles out and over; 7. Conclusions; NOTES; "SAY": FOCUS ON THE MESSAGE; 0. Introduction; 1. Active subject; 2. Direct object; 3. The subject of passive sentences.; 4. The referent of so, as and like.; 5. Non-nuclear constituents.; 6. Manner adverbials.; 7. 'Absolute uses'
  • 8. The meaning (s) of say.9. Postscript.; NOTES; ASPECTSOF THE LINGUISTIC ACTION SCENE WITH "TELL"; 0. Introduction; 1. The scene of the linguistic action verb tell; 1.1. Subject; 1.2. Object; 1.3. Indirect Object; 1.4. Prepositional phrases; 1.5. Adverbial Adjuncts; 2. Syntactico-semantic features of L.A.V. tell; 2.1. With Addressee; 2.1.1. INFORM-tell; a. With Message; b. INFORM-tell with Topic; 2.1.2. NARRATE-tell; 2.2. Without Addressee; 2.2.1. MAKEOUT-tell; 2.2.2. EXPRESS IN WORDS -- tell; 2.2.3. MAKE KNOWN--tell; 3. Non-Linguistic Action Verb tell; 3.1. COUNT-tell; 3.2. EFFECT-tell
Control code
ocn769342236
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (191 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027280596
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)769342236

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