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The Resource The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought, edited by Mirko Canevaro.and Benjamin Gray

The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought, edited by Mirko Canevaro.and Benjamin Gray

Label
The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought
Title
The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought
Statement of responsibility
edited by Mirko Canevaro.and Benjamin Gray
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
In the Hellenistic period (c.323-31 BCE), Greek teachers, philosophers, historians, orators, and politicians found an essential point of reference in the democracy of Classical Athens and the political thought which it produced. However, while Athenian civic life and thought in the Classical period have been intensively studied, these aspects of the Hellenistic period have so far received much less attention. This volume seeks to bring together the two areas of research, shedding new light on these complementary parts of the history of the ancient Greek polis
Dewey number
938
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Canevaro, Mirko,
  • Gray, Benjamin,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hellenism
  • Athens (Greece)
  • Democracy
Label
The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought, edited by Mirko Canevaro.and Benjamin Gray
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; The Hellenistic Reception of Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought; Copyright; Preface and Acknowledgements; Contents; List of Abbreviations; List of Contributors; 1: Introduction; 1.1 Classical Athenian Politics as Cultural Memory and Political Resource in the Hellenistic World; 1.2 The Structure of the Volume; 1.2.1 Part I: The Reception of Classical Athens in the Early Hellenistic World; 1.2.2 Part II: Changing Approaches to Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought from Polybius to Plutarch; 1.3 Common Themes and Questions Raised by the Essays
  • 1.3.1 Political Institutions, Hellenistic Democracy, and the Elites1.3.2 Athenocentrism as a Focus of Hellenistic and Modern Debates; 1.3.3 Political Thought, the Anti-Democratic Tradition, and Alternatives to Democracy; Part I: Early Hellenistic Responses to Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought; 2: Stairway to Heaven: The Politics of Memory in Early Hellenistic Athens; 2.1 Athenian Politics and the Past; 2.2 The Chremonidean War, or, What's in a Name; 2.3 The Decree of the Demagogues; 2.4 From the Lamian War to the Chremonidean War
  • 2.5 The Decree of Chremonides: Declaring War, between Past and Present2.6 The End of an Age-in Some Sense; 3: Alexander the Great and Democracy in the Hellenistic World; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Philip, Alexander, and the Cities of Mainland Greece; 3.3 Philip, Alexander, and the Cities of Western Asia Minor; 3.4 Alexander in Athens; 3.4.1 Polyperchon and Athens, 319/8-318/7; 3.4.2 Demetrius and Athens, 307/6; 3.4.3 Demochares and Athens, 281/0; 3.5 Alexander in Asia Minor; 3.6 Alexander between City and King
  • 4: Demosthenic Influences in Early Rhetorical Education: Hellenistic Rhetores and Athenian Imagination4.1 Demosthenes ́(Un)popularity in the Hellenistic Period; 4.2 The Influence of Demosthenic Oratory and the Importance of Athenian Imagination; 4.3 Conclusions; 5: Sophists, Epicureans, and Stoics; 5.1 Stoics on Sophistry and Education; 5.2 Epicureans, Protagoras, and Sophistic; 5.3 Many but One: Sophists on Justice; 5.4 One and Many: Early Epicureans on Justice; 6: Comedy and the Athenian Ideal
  • Part II: Later Hellenistic and Early Imperial Developments in the Reception of Classical Athenian Politics7: Polybius on ̀Classical Athenian Imperial Democracy and Athens in Book 6; 7.2 Athens in Action: Athenian Diplomacy in the Historical Narrative; 7.3 Polybius ́Characterizations of Athens in Political Context; 7.4 Conclusion; 8: A Later Hellenistic Debate about the Value of Classical Athenian Civic Ideals?: The Evidence of Epigraphy, Historiography, and Philosophy; 8.1 Introduction
Control code
on1019680959
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191065354
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1019680959
Label
The Hellenistic reception of classical Athenian democracy and political thought, edited by Mirko Canevaro.and Benjamin Gray
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; The Hellenistic Reception of Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought; Copyright; Preface and Acknowledgements; Contents; List of Abbreviations; List of Contributors; 1: Introduction; 1.1 Classical Athenian Politics as Cultural Memory and Political Resource in the Hellenistic World; 1.2 The Structure of the Volume; 1.2.1 Part I: The Reception of Classical Athens in the Early Hellenistic World; 1.2.2 Part II: Changing Approaches to Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought from Polybius to Plutarch; 1.3 Common Themes and Questions Raised by the Essays
  • 1.3.1 Political Institutions, Hellenistic Democracy, and the Elites1.3.2 Athenocentrism as a Focus of Hellenistic and Modern Debates; 1.3.3 Political Thought, the Anti-Democratic Tradition, and Alternatives to Democracy; Part I: Early Hellenistic Responses to Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought; 2: Stairway to Heaven: The Politics of Memory in Early Hellenistic Athens; 2.1 Athenian Politics and the Past; 2.2 The Chremonidean War, or, What's in a Name; 2.3 The Decree of the Demagogues; 2.4 From the Lamian War to the Chremonidean War
  • 2.5 The Decree of Chremonides: Declaring War, between Past and Present2.6 The End of an Age-in Some Sense; 3: Alexander the Great and Democracy in the Hellenistic World; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Philip, Alexander, and the Cities of Mainland Greece; 3.3 Philip, Alexander, and the Cities of Western Asia Minor; 3.4 Alexander in Athens; 3.4.1 Polyperchon and Athens, 319/8-318/7; 3.4.2 Demetrius and Athens, 307/6; 3.4.3 Demochares and Athens, 281/0; 3.5 Alexander in Asia Minor; 3.6 Alexander between City and King
  • 4: Demosthenic Influences in Early Rhetorical Education: Hellenistic Rhetores and Athenian Imagination4.1 Demosthenes ́(Un)popularity in the Hellenistic Period; 4.2 The Influence of Demosthenic Oratory and the Importance of Athenian Imagination; 4.3 Conclusions; 5: Sophists, Epicureans, and Stoics; 5.1 Stoics on Sophistry and Education; 5.2 Epicureans, Protagoras, and Sophistic; 5.3 Many but One: Sophists on Justice; 5.4 One and Many: Early Epicureans on Justice; 6: Comedy and the Athenian Ideal
  • Part II: Later Hellenistic and Early Imperial Developments in the Reception of Classical Athenian Politics7: Polybius on ̀Classical Athenian Imperial Democracy and Athens in Book 6; 7.2 Athens in Action: Athenian Diplomacy in the Historical Narrative; 7.3 Polybius ́Characterizations of Athens in Political Context; 7.4 Conclusion; 8: A Later Hellenistic Debate about the Value of Classical Athenian Civic Ideals?: The Evidence of Epigraphy, Historiography, and Philosophy; 8.1 Introduction
Control code
on1019680959
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191065354
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1019680959

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