Coverart for item
The Resource Reference and representation in thought and language, edited by María de Ponte, Kepa Korta

Reference and representation in thought and language, edited by María de Ponte, Kepa Korta

Label
Reference and representation in thought and language
Title
Reference and representation in thought and language
Statement of responsibility
edited by María de Ponte, Kepa Korta
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This volume offers novel views on the precise relation between reference to an object by means of a linguistic expression and our mental representation of that object, long a source of debate in the philosophy of language, linguistics, and cognitive science. Chapters in this volume deal with our devices for singular reference and singular representation, with most focusing on linguistic expressions that are used to refer to particular objects, persons, or places. These expressions include proper names such as Mary and John; indexicals such as I and tomorrow; demonstrative pronouns such as this and that; and some definite and indefinite descriptions such as The Queen of England or a medical doctor. Other chapters examine the ways we represent objects in thought, particularly the first-person perspective and the self, and one explores a notion common to reference and representation: salience. The volume includes the latest views on these complex topics from some of the most prominent authors in the field and will be of interest to anyone working on issues of reference and representation in thought and language
Member of
Dewey number
401
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Ponte, María de,
  • Korta, Kepa,
Series statement
Oxford linguistics
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Language and languages
  • Reference (Linguistics)
  • Realization (Linguistics)
Label
Reference and representation in thought and language, edited by María de Ponte, Kepa Korta
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Reference and Representation in Thought and Language; Copyright; Contents; The Contributors; 1: Introduction; 2: Names, predicates, and the object-property distinction; 2.1 Subject and predicate: Object and property; 2.2 What proper names do; 2.3 Predicates and the properties things have in common; 3: Proper names: Gender, context sensitivity, and conversational implicatures; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Names and gender determination; 3.3 Names, meaning, and conversational implicatures; 3.4 Names and context sensitivity; 3.5 Conclusion; 4: Indexicals and undexicals; 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Temporal indexicals4.3 Roles and information games; 4.4 Indexicality; 4.5 Conclusion; 5: Reference, intention, and context: Do demonstratives really refer?; 5.1 Demonstratives: A lack of character?; 5.2 Two versions of semantic intentionalism; 5.3 The meaning of demonstratives and the status of referential intentions; 5.4 Clarifications and replies to some objections; 5.5 Summing up; 6: Semantic complexity; 6.1 Rigidity and referring expressions; 6.2 Reference and semantic construction; 6.3 Criteria for intelligibility; 6.4 Systematic acts of referring
  • 6.5 Syntactic arguments and uses of indexicals6.6 The way forward; 7: Donnellan's misdescriptions and loose talk; 7.1 Problems with Kripke's account of referential misdescriptions; 7.2 A first defence of Donnellan's strong claim: Kinds of strong inertness thesis; 7.3 Donnellan's argument against Humpty Dumpty; 7.4 Donnellan's point on loose talk; 7.5 A weakened inertness thesis and its challenges; 7.6 Two ways of presenting a weakened inertness thesis; 7.7 Conclusions; 8: Pre-semantic pragmatic enrichment: The case of long-distance reflexivization; 8.1 Long-distance reflexivization
  • 8.1.1 What is long-distance reflexivization?8.1.2 An implicational universal for long-distance reflexivization complement types; 8.1.3 Properties of long-distance reflexivization; 8.2 Determining the reference of long-distance reflexivization: A neo-Gricean pragmatic approach; 8.2.1 Grice's cooperative principle and maxims of conversation; 8.2.2 Three neo-Gricean pragmatic principles; 8.2.3 A revised neo-Gricean pragmatic theory of anaphora; 8.2.4 Reference determination for long-distance reflexivization:A neo-Gricean pragmatic analysis
  • 8.2.5 Why is a long-distance reflexive used? Three types of unexpectedness8.3 Pre-semantic pragmatic penetration into reference identification: Explicature, pragmatically enriched said, implicIture or implicAture?; Appendix: Abbreviations; 9: The interplay of recipient design and salience in shaping speaker's utterance; 9.1 Introduction; 9.2 The sociocognitive approach; 9.2.1 Main tenets of the sociocognitive approach; 9.2.2 Salience in the sociocognitive approach; 9.3 How is the speaker's utterance shaped?; 9.4 Context and speaker meaning
Control code
ocn993938856
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First Edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191023651
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)993938856
Label
Reference and representation in thought and language, edited by María de Ponte, Kepa Korta
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Reference and Representation in Thought and Language; Copyright; Contents; The Contributors; 1: Introduction; 2: Names, predicates, and the object-property distinction; 2.1 Subject and predicate: Object and property; 2.2 What proper names do; 2.3 Predicates and the properties things have in common; 3: Proper names: Gender, context sensitivity, and conversational implicatures; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Names and gender determination; 3.3 Names, meaning, and conversational implicatures; 3.4 Names and context sensitivity; 3.5 Conclusion; 4: Indexicals and undexicals; 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Temporal indexicals4.3 Roles and information games; 4.4 Indexicality; 4.5 Conclusion; 5: Reference, intention, and context: Do demonstratives really refer?; 5.1 Demonstratives: A lack of character?; 5.2 Two versions of semantic intentionalism; 5.3 The meaning of demonstratives and the status of referential intentions; 5.4 Clarifications and replies to some objections; 5.5 Summing up; 6: Semantic complexity; 6.1 Rigidity and referring expressions; 6.2 Reference and semantic construction; 6.3 Criteria for intelligibility; 6.4 Systematic acts of referring
  • 6.5 Syntactic arguments and uses of indexicals6.6 The way forward; 7: Donnellan's misdescriptions and loose talk; 7.1 Problems with Kripke's account of referential misdescriptions; 7.2 A first defence of Donnellan's strong claim: Kinds of strong inertness thesis; 7.3 Donnellan's argument against Humpty Dumpty; 7.4 Donnellan's point on loose talk; 7.5 A weakened inertness thesis and its challenges; 7.6 Two ways of presenting a weakened inertness thesis; 7.7 Conclusions; 8: Pre-semantic pragmatic enrichment: The case of long-distance reflexivization; 8.1 Long-distance reflexivization
  • 8.1.1 What is long-distance reflexivization?8.1.2 An implicational universal for long-distance reflexivization complement types; 8.1.3 Properties of long-distance reflexivization; 8.2 Determining the reference of long-distance reflexivization: A neo-Gricean pragmatic approach; 8.2.1 Grice's cooperative principle and maxims of conversation; 8.2.2 Three neo-Gricean pragmatic principles; 8.2.3 A revised neo-Gricean pragmatic theory of anaphora; 8.2.4 Reference determination for long-distance reflexivization:A neo-Gricean pragmatic analysis
  • 8.2.5 Why is a long-distance reflexive used? Three types of unexpectedness8.3 Pre-semantic pragmatic penetration into reference identification: Explicature, pragmatically enriched said, implicIture or implicAture?; Appendix: Abbreviations; 9: The interplay of recipient design and salience in shaping speaker's utterance; 9.1 Introduction; 9.2 The sociocognitive approach; 9.2.1 Main tenets of the sociocognitive approach; 9.2.2 Salience in the sociocognitive approach; 9.3 How is the speaker's utterance shaped?; 9.4 Context and speaker meaning
Control code
ocn993938856
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First Edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191023651
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)993938856

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