Coverart for item
The Resource Prominent interal possessors, edited by András Bárány, Oliver Bond, and Irina Nikolaeva

Prominent interal possessors, edited by András Bárány, Oliver Bond, and Irina Nikolaeva

Label
Prominent interal possessors
Title
Prominent interal possessors
Statement of responsibility
edited by András Bárány, Oliver Bond, and Irina Nikolaeva
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This volume is the first to provide a comprehensive cross-linguistic overview of the clause-level argument-like behaviour of internal possessors. It offers focused case studies of the syntactic, semantics, and pragmatics of the phenomenon in languages of the Americas, Eurasia, South Asia, and Australia, based on novel data collected by the authors
Member of
Dewey number
415
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Bárány, András,
  • Bond, Oliver,
  • Nikolaeva, Irina,
Series statement
Oxford linguistics
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Comparative linguistics
Label
Prominent interal possessors, edited by András Bárány, Oliver Bond, and Irina Nikolaeva
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Prominent Internal Possessors; Copyright; Contents; List of abbreviations; The contributors; 1: Towards a typology of prominent internal possessors; 1.1 Definition and challenges; 1.2 Languages and sources; 1.3 Relevant parameters of variation; 1.3.1 The phrase-internal properties of PIPs; 1.3.2 Grammatical role of the possessed noun; 1.3.3 Functional prominence of PIPs; 1.4 Analyses and their implications; 1.4.1 Possessors as heads; 1.4.2 PIPs with external representation; 1.4.3 PIPs with no external representation; 1.4.4 Information structure-based accounts
  • 1.5 Concluding remarks and outlookAcknowledgements; 2: The syntax of possessor prominence in Maithili; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Background on Maithili; 2.2.1 Nominals; 2.2.2 Pronominals; 2.2.3 Predicate agreement paradigms; 2.3 Agreement with a single controller; 2.3.1 Single nominative agreement; 2.3.2 Single non-nominative agreement; 2.4 Double agreement; 2.4.1 Primary controller; 2.4.2 Secondary controllers; 2.4.3 Previous analyses of double agreement; 2.5 The grammatical function of secondary controllers; 2.6 The role of referential features; 2.6.1 Non-possessor controllers
  • 2.6.1.1 First and second person secondary controllers2.6.1.2 Third person secondary controllers; 2.6.1.3 Summary; 2.6.2 Possessor controllers; 2.7 Non-subject agreement and focus; 2.7.1 Focussed non-possessors; 2.7.2 Focussed possessors; 2.8 Discussion; Acknowledgements; 3: Prominent possessor indexing in Gurindji; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Gurindji possessive constructions; 3.2.1 Case-marking; 3.2.2 Indexation of terms and non-terms; 3.2.3 Possessive construction types; 3.2.3.1 Alienable Possessor Constructions; 3.2.3.2 Prominent Alienable Possessor Constructions
  • 3.2.3.3 Inalienable Possessor Constructions3.3 Potential analysis; 3.4 Analysis; 3.4.1 Appositional possessors; 3.4.2 Prominent internal possessors; 3.5 Conclusion; Acknowledgements; 4: Disjoint and reflexive prominent internal possessor constructions in Chimane; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Background on Chimane; 4.2.1 General information; 4.2.2 Possessive phrase; 4.3 Disjoint prominent internal possessor construction; 4.3.1 Morphosyntactic and semantic features of disjoint PIPCs; 4.3.2 Towards an analysis of disjoint PIPCs; 4.4 Reflexive prominent internal possessor construction
  • 4.4.1 Morphosyntactic and semantic features of reflexive PIPCs4.4.2 Potential analyses of reflexive PIPCs; 4.5 Conclusion; Acknowledgments; 5: Extended agreement in Oneida (Iroquoian); 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Background; 5.2.1 The Oneida language; 5.2.2 Oneida pronominal prefixes; 5.2.3 The relation between external NPs and verbs; 5.3 The structure of clauses that include body part NPs; 5.3.1 Three morphological classes of verbs; 5.3.2 Is the locative suffix polyfunctional?; 5.4 Is there a prominent internal possessor construction?
Control code
on1089931373
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780192540157
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1089931373
Label
Prominent interal possessors, edited by András Bárány, Oliver Bond, and Irina Nikolaeva
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Prominent Internal Possessors; Copyright; Contents; List of abbreviations; The contributors; 1: Towards a typology of prominent internal possessors; 1.1 Definition and challenges; 1.2 Languages and sources; 1.3 Relevant parameters of variation; 1.3.1 The phrase-internal properties of PIPs; 1.3.2 Grammatical role of the possessed noun; 1.3.3 Functional prominence of PIPs; 1.4 Analyses and their implications; 1.4.1 Possessors as heads; 1.4.2 PIPs with external representation; 1.4.3 PIPs with no external representation; 1.4.4 Information structure-based accounts
  • 1.5 Concluding remarks and outlookAcknowledgements; 2: The syntax of possessor prominence in Maithili; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Background on Maithili; 2.2.1 Nominals; 2.2.2 Pronominals; 2.2.3 Predicate agreement paradigms; 2.3 Agreement with a single controller; 2.3.1 Single nominative agreement; 2.3.2 Single non-nominative agreement; 2.4 Double agreement; 2.4.1 Primary controller; 2.4.2 Secondary controllers; 2.4.3 Previous analyses of double agreement; 2.5 The grammatical function of secondary controllers; 2.6 The role of referential features; 2.6.1 Non-possessor controllers
  • 2.6.1.1 First and second person secondary controllers2.6.1.2 Third person secondary controllers; 2.6.1.3 Summary; 2.6.2 Possessor controllers; 2.7 Non-subject agreement and focus; 2.7.1 Focussed non-possessors; 2.7.2 Focussed possessors; 2.8 Discussion; Acknowledgements; 3: Prominent possessor indexing in Gurindji; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Gurindji possessive constructions; 3.2.1 Case-marking; 3.2.2 Indexation of terms and non-terms; 3.2.3 Possessive construction types; 3.2.3.1 Alienable Possessor Constructions; 3.2.3.2 Prominent Alienable Possessor Constructions
  • 3.2.3.3 Inalienable Possessor Constructions3.3 Potential analysis; 3.4 Analysis; 3.4.1 Appositional possessors; 3.4.2 Prominent internal possessors; 3.5 Conclusion; Acknowledgements; 4: Disjoint and reflexive prominent internal possessor constructions in Chimane; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Background on Chimane; 4.2.1 General information; 4.2.2 Possessive phrase; 4.3 Disjoint prominent internal possessor construction; 4.3.1 Morphosyntactic and semantic features of disjoint PIPCs; 4.3.2 Towards an analysis of disjoint PIPCs; 4.4 Reflexive prominent internal possessor construction
  • 4.4.1 Morphosyntactic and semantic features of reflexive PIPCs4.4.2 Potential analyses of reflexive PIPCs; 4.5 Conclusion; Acknowledgments; 5: Extended agreement in Oneida (Iroquoian); 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Background; 5.2.1 The Oneida language; 5.2.2 Oneida pronominal prefixes; 5.2.3 The relation between external NPs and verbs; 5.3 The structure of clauses that include body part NPs; 5.3.1 Three morphological classes of verbs; 5.3.2 Is the locative suffix polyfunctional?; 5.4 Is there a prominent internal possessor construction?
Control code
on1089931373
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780192540157
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1089931373

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