Coverart for item
The Resource Natural questions, Seneca ; with an English translation by Thomas H. Corcoran, (electronic resource)

Natural questions, Seneca ; with an English translation by Thomas H. Corcoran, (electronic resource)

Label
Natural questions
Title
Natural questions
Statement of responsibility
Seneca ; with an English translation by Thomas H. Corcoran
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • lat
  • lat
  • eng
Summary
Seneca (c. 4-65 CE) devotes most of Naturales Quaestiones to celestial phenomena. In Book 1 he discusses fires in the atmosphere; in 2, lightning and thunder; in 3, bodies of water. Seneca's method is to survey the theories of major authorities on the subject at hand, so his work is a guide to Greek and Roman thinking about the heavens.
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
approximately 4 B.C.-65 A.D
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus
Language note
Text in Latin with English translation on facing pages
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Corcoran, Thomas H
Series statement
Loeb Classical Library ;
Series volume
450, 457
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Meteorology
  • Science, Ancient
Summary expansion
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus, born at Corduba (Cordova) ca. 4 BCE, of a prominent and wealthy family, spent an ailing childhood and youth at Rome in an aunt's care. He became famous in rhetoric, philosophy, money-making, and imperial service. After some disgrace during Claudius' reign he became tutor and then, in 54 CE, advising minister to Nero, some of whose worst misdeeds he did not prevent. Involved (innocently?) in a conspiracy, he killed himself by order in 65. Wealthy, he preached indifference to wealth; evader of pain and death, he preached scorn of both; and there were other contrasts between practice and principle. We have Seneca's philosophical or moral essays (ten of them traditionally called Dialogues)--on providence, steadfastness, the happy life, anger, leisure, tranquility, the brevity of life, gift-giving, forgiveness--and treatises on natural phenomena. Also extant are 124 epistles, in which he writes in a relaxed style about moral and ethical questions, relating them to personal experiences; a skit on the official deification of Claudius, Apocolocyntosis (in Loeb number 15); and nine rhetorical tragedies on ancient Greek themes. Many epistles and all his speeches are lost. The 124 epistles are collected in Volumes IV-VI of the Loeb Classical Library's ten-volume edition of Seneca. The treatises on natural phenomena, Naturales Quaestiones, are collected in Volumes VII and X of the Loeb Classical Library's ten-volume edition of Seneca
Target audience
general
Label
Natural questions, Seneca ; with an English translation by Thomas H. Corcoran, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Color
multicolored
Contents
v. I. Books 1-3 -- v. II. Books 4-7
Control code
hup0000550
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Other physical details
diagrams
Specific material designation
remote
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
Natural questions, Seneca ; with an English translation by Thomas H. Corcoran, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Includes index
Color
multicolored
Contents
v. I. Books 1-3 -- v. II. Books 4-7
Control code
hup0000550
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Other physical details
diagrams
Specific material designation
remote
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

Library Locations

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