Coverart for item
The Resource Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism, Patrick F. Walsh

Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism, Patrick F. Walsh

Label
Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism
Title
Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism
Statement of responsibility
Patrick F. Walsh
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book explores how potential bio-threats and risks may evolve post 9/11 given the rapid changes in biotechnology and synthetic biology. It also explores what role intelligence communities can play in understanding threats and risks. It argues that although bio-threats and risks are largely low probability and high impact in nature, intelligence in ‘Five Eyes’ countries remain insufficiently prepared to understand them. This book identifies key areas where intelligence reforms need to take place including a more strategic and systematic collaboration between national security/law enforcement intelligence and the scientific community. It is aimed at intelligence analysts, those in the scientific community working on health security threats, policy makers and researchers working on biosecurity and bioterrorism threats and risks.--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Walsh, Patrick F.,
Dewey number
327.12
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Intelligence service
  • National security
  • Terrorism
  • Biosecurity
Label
Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism, Patrick F. Walsh
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Intro; Acknowledgements; Contents; About the Author; 1 Introduction; The Audience; The Book's Points of Difference; Book Scope and Limitations; Why Intelligence?; Defining Terminology; Intelligence; Biosecurity; Bioterrorism; Bio-crime; Bio-risk; Bio-threat; The Structure of the Book; The Book's Four Objectives; References; 2 The Biosecurity Threat Environment; Defining 'The Biosecurity Threat Environment'; Past Biosecurity Threat Environment (1945-2001); Present Biosecurity Threat Environment (2001-Present); Emerging Biosecurity Threats (2018-2023); Stolen Biological Agents
  • Dual Use Research and Synthetic BiologyConclusion; References; 3 Intelligence Tasking and Coordination; Biosecurity and Intelligence; Biosecurity Intelligence Tasking Priorities; Coordination; Risk and Threat Assessment; Defining Bio-risk; Defining Bio-threat; Conclusion; References; 4 Collection; Traditional Collection Methods; Signals Intelligence (SIGINT); Human Intelligence (HUMINT); Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT); Open Source, Scientific, Medical and Research Collection Platforms; Open Source Intelligence; Scientific, Medical and Research Collection; The Scientific Community
  • EpidemiologyForensics; Collection Challenges; References; 5 Analysis; Intelligence Analysts in the Bio-Threat and Risk Sectors; Analytical Methods and Techniques; Interpretivist vs Empirical Methodologies; Interpretivist Methodologies; Empirical; Fit for Purpose; Conclusion; References; 6 Intelligence Governance; Intelligence Governance; Why Intelligence Governance?; Intelligence Governance: Bio-Threats and Risks; Leadership; Operationalising a National Health Security Strategy; ICT; HR; Research; Conclusion; References; 7 Intelligence and Stakeholders; Prevention
  • Improving Bio-Surveillance CapabilityImproving National, Regional and Global Health Security Capacity; WHO IHR; Biological Weapons Convention (BWC); The Proliferation Security Initiative and the Australia Group; Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA); Stakeholders and Their Own Biosafety Procedures; Disruption; Criminology; Counter Terrorism; Cyber; Treatment; First Responders; Science and Technology; Security; Conclusion; References; 8 Oversight and Accountability; Legislation; Specific Biosafety, Biosecurity Legislation; Legislative Challenges; Other Intelligence Related Legislation
  • Meeting the ChallengesRegulation Oversight and Accountability; Regulation; Meeting the Challenges; Oversight and Accountability; Conclusion; References; 9 Conclusion; Future Outlook (2023 and Beyond); References; Index
Control code
on1053623313
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781137517005
Level of compression
unknown
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1053623313
Label
Intelligence, biosecurity and bioterrorism, Patrick F. Walsh
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Intro; Acknowledgements; Contents; About the Author; 1 Introduction; The Audience; The Book's Points of Difference; Book Scope and Limitations; Why Intelligence?; Defining Terminology; Intelligence; Biosecurity; Bioterrorism; Bio-crime; Bio-risk; Bio-threat; The Structure of the Book; The Book's Four Objectives; References; 2 The Biosecurity Threat Environment; Defining 'The Biosecurity Threat Environment'; Past Biosecurity Threat Environment (1945-2001); Present Biosecurity Threat Environment (2001-Present); Emerging Biosecurity Threats (2018-2023); Stolen Biological Agents
  • Dual Use Research and Synthetic BiologyConclusion; References; 3 Intelligence Tasking and Coordination; Biosecurity and Intelligence; Biosecurity Intelligence Tasking Priorities; Coordination; Risk and Threat Assessment; Defining Bio-risk; Defining Bio-threat; Conclusion; References; 4 Collection; Traditional Collection Methods; Signals Intelligence (SIGINT); Human Intelligence (HUMINT); Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT); Open Source, Scientific, Medical and Research Collection Platforms; Open Source Intelligence; Scientific, Medical and Research Collection; The Scientific Community
  • EpidemiologyForensics; Collection Challenges; References; 5 Analysis; Intelligence Analysts in the Bio-Threat and Risk Sectors; Analytical Methods and Techniques; Interpretivist vs Empirical Methodologies; Interpretivist Methodologies; Empirical; Fit for Purpose; Conclusion; References; 6 Intelligence Governance; Intelligence Governance; Why Intelligence Governance?; Intelligence Governance: Bio-Threats and Risks; Leadership; Operationalising a National Health Security Strategy; ICT; HR; Research; Conclusion; References; 7 Intelligence and Stakeholders; Prevention
  • Improving Bio-Surveillance CapabilityImproving National, Regional and Global Health Security Capacity; WHO IHR; Biological Weapons Convention (BWC); The Proliferation Security Initiative and the Australia Group; Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA); Stakeholders and Their Own Biosafety Procedures; Disruption; Criminology; Counter Terrorism; Cyber; Treatment; First Responders; Science and Technology; Security; Conclusion; References; 8 Oversight and Accountability; Legislation; Specific Biosafety, Biosecurity Legislation; Legislative Challenges; Other Intelligence Related Legislation
  • Meeting the ChallengesRegulation Oversight and Accountability; Regulation; Meeting the Challenges; Oversight and Accountability; Conclusion; References; 9 Conclusion; Future Outlook (2023 and Beyond); References; Index
Control code
on1053623313
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781137517005
Level of compression
unknown
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1053623313

Library Locations

    • InternetBorrow it
      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
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