Coverart for item
The Resource How traditions live and die, Olivier Morin, (electronic resource)

How traditions live and die, Olivier Morin, (electronic resource)

Label
How traditions live and die
Title
How traditions live and die
Statement of responsibility
Olivier Morin
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Morin, Olivier
Dewey number
306
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Foundations of human interaction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Tradition (Philosophy)
  • Knowledge, Sociology of
  • Social change
  • Social values
  • Socialization
  • Culture diffusion
  • Interpersonal communication and culture
Label
How traditions live and die, Olivier Morin, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Not All Differences between Societies Are Traditional
  • ... and Cultural Progress May Do without Conservation
  • The Growing Number of Traditions Is What Matters
  • The Opening Up of the Human Public Domain
  • Human Populations Became Increasingly Hospitable to Culture...
  • ... But Hospitable Populations Are No Guarantee of Cultural Progress
  • The Extreme Accumulation Hypothesis
  • What Kind of Cultural Animal Are We?
  • We Need Not Believe that We Are Wired for Culture...
  • ... or that Communication Is Designed for Cultural Transmission
  • A Species Taken in a Cultural Avalanche
  • Our Cultural Repertoires Could Not Exist without Transmission
  • The Growing Weight of Traditions Does Not Erase Human Nature
  • A Cultural Animal by Accident
  • Culture: A Set of Traditions Rather than a Set of Differences
  • Do Traditions Exist?
  • Some Traditions Are as Durable as They Seem
  • Culture Is Not an Undecomposable Whole
  • Why Anthropologists Are No Longer Interested in Traditions
  • Traditions Do Not Exist Solely as Ideas
  • Two Questions
  • Why Are There Traditions Rather than Nothing?
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Why Does One Species Monopolize Traditions?
  • Imitating and Understanding Others
  • Looking for "True Imitation"
  • Imitation Is neither a Human Privilege nor the Source of Our Cultures
  • Human Ostensive Communication
  • Involuntary Transmission: When Behaviors Leak Information
  • Non-Ostensive Voluntary Transmission
  • Voluntary and Overt Transmission: a Human Phenomenon
  • Culture Did Not Build Our Communicative Skills from the Ground Up
  • Ostensive Communication Is Not Particularly Faithful
  • Culture as Distributed
  • Communicating to Imitate, Imitating to Communicate
  • Communication for Imitation: Demonstrations and "Rational" Imitation
  • Ostensive Communication Goes Beyond Teaching
  • It Takes Place at Any Time, from Anyone, and for Any Reason
  • It Requires an Active Reconstruction of the Transmitted Material
  • It Can Bypass Language
  • It Does Not Need Adults
  • "A Light, Insubstantial, Fugitive Web"
  • How Far Do We Follow Conformity and Deference?
  • An Ambiguity of Dual Inheritance Theory
  • Cultural Homogeneity Is Overrated ...
  • "Simple Heuristics that Make Us Smart"[—]Really?
  • Docility: Does Compulsive Imitation Breed Altruism?
  • The Case for Flexible Imitation
  • Imitation: the Key that Unlocks Every Door?
  • Conformity and Deference: Psychological Mechanisms or Social Facts?
  • Cultural Diffusion in a Population of Flexible Imitators
  • Negative Informational Cascades Are Short or Rare
  • Waves of Compulsive Imitation: Often Evoked, Seldom Documented
  • The Influence of Influentials: Tautology or Misunderstanding?
  • Closing the Case against the Imitation Hypothesis
  • ... Yet Homogeneity Remains a Heavily Influential Hypothesis
  • Transmission Is Easy, Diffusion Is Hard
  • There Is No Inertia for Transmission
  • Why a Few Transmission Episodes Do Not Make a Diffusion Chain
  • Transmission Fidelity Is Not the Problem
  • For Transmission, Quantity Matters More than Quality
  • Cultural Transmission Is No Chinese Whispers Game
  • A Tradition Must Be Carried by Many Robust Diffusion Chains
  • Redundancy and Repetition Make Diffusion Chains Less Fragile
  • Traditions Must Proliferate in Order to Survive
  • Stability and Success Go Together
  • A Quantitative and Abstract View of Culture
  • Why Do Traditions Proliferate?
  • Accessibility: Certain Populations Make Contacts Easier
  • Many Ways to Proliferate, Several Types of Diffusion Chains
  • Cultural Selection[—]Many Are Called, Few Are Chosen
  • Traditions Survive Cultural Selection by Being Attractive
  • Attraction Can Be Linked to a Restricted Context, or More General
  • Traditions Are Appealing in Many Ways, Not All of Them Cognitive
  • Transmission Is Not Memorization, Culture Is Not Collective Memory
  • When Does Psychology Drive Culture?
  • Politeness Norms Last Longer if They Tap into Our Sense of Disgust
  • What Is Cultural Transmission?
  • Among the Kwaio, Beliefs about Spirits Survived by Being Intuitive
  • Generally Attractive Traditions Do Not Always Prevail
  • How the Vagaries of Diffusion Dilute General Attraction
  • Local Attraction Can Override General Attraction, Locally
  • General Attraction Prevails in Long and Narrow Diffusion Chains
  • For Instance, Widely Diffused Languages Tend to Be Easier on the Mind
  • The Benefit of Moving across Scales When Looking at Culture
  • "That Constant Stream of Recruits to Mankind"
  • Demographic Generations Are Not Social Generations
  • How to Link Humans Scattered across Time
  • Distinguishing Diffusion and Transmission
  • How Generational Overlap Makes Diffusion Easier
  • Demographic and Social Obstacles to Transmission
  • Everything Your Parents Did Not Teach You about Culture
  • Why Do Children Have Traditions?
  • The Lost World of Children's Peer Culture
  • Children's Traditions Are Not Vestigial Adult Practices
  • They Are Mostly Transmitted from Child to Child
  • They Are Children's Games, and They Look Like It
  • They Are at Least as Durable as Cross-Generational Traditions
  • They Are Homogenic and Share a Common Fate
  • Transmission and Invention Are Not Opposites
  • What Makes Children's Peer Culture Last?
  • Traditionalism Is Not What Took Children's Culture across Time
  • Neither Does Memorability Preserve Children's Rhymes
  • Children's Traditions Were Selected to Proliferate
  • Generational Turnover Need Not Impair Cultural Survival
  • Three Clues for One Puzzle
  • What Is Cultural Accumulation?
  • "Cumulative Culture" Is an Avatar of Evolutionary Gradualism
  • Faithfully Replicated Small Changes Cannot Explain Everything
  • Traditions Often Endure without Improving...
Control code
ocn922640465
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190210519
Isbn Type
(electronic book)
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)922640465
Label
How traditions live and die, Olivier Morin, (electronic resource)
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Not All Differences between Societies Are Traditional
  • ... and Cultural Progress May Do without Conservation
  • The Growing Number of Traditions Is What Matters
  • The Opening Up of the Human Public Domain
  • Human Populations Became Increasingly Hospitable to Culture...
  • ... But Hospitable Populations Are No Guarantee of Cultural Progress
  • The Extreme Accumulation Hypothesis
  • What Kind of Cultural Animal Are We?
  • We Need Not Believe that We Are Wired for Culture...
  • ... or that Communication Is Designed for Cultural Transmission
  • A Species Taken in a Cultural Avalanche
  • Our Cultural Repertoires Could Not Exist without Transmission
  • The Growing Weight of Traditions Does Not Erase Human Nature
  • A Cultural Animal by Accident
  • Culture: A Set of Traditions Rather than a Set of Differences
  • Do Traditions Exist?
  • Some Traditions Are as Durable as They Seem
  • Culture Is Not an Undecomposable Whole
  • Why Anthropologists Are No Longer Interested in Traditions
  • Traditions Do Not Exist Solely as Ideas
  • Two Questions
  • Why Are There Traditions Rather than Nothing?
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Why Does One Species Monopolize Traditions?
  • Imitating and Understanding Others
  • Looking for "True Imitation"
  • Imitation Is neither a Human Privilege nor the Source of Our Cultures
  • Human Ostensive Communication
  • Involuntary Transmission: When Behaviors Leak Information
  • Non-Ostensive Voluntary Transmission
  • Voluntary and Overt Transmission: a Human Phenomenon
  • Culture Did Not Build Our Communicative Skills from the Ground Up
  • Ostensive Communication Is Not Particularly Faithful
  • Culture as Distributed
  • Communicating to Imitate, Imitating to Communicate
  • Communication for Imitation: Demonstrations and "Rational" Imitation
  • Ostensive Communication Goes Beyond Teaching
  • It Takes Place at Any Time, from Anyone, and for Any Reason
  • It Requires an Active Reconstruction of the Transmitted Material
  • It Can Bypass Language
  • It Does Not Need Adults
  • "A Light, Insubstantial, Fugitive Web"
  • How Far Do We Follow Conformity and Deference?
  • An Ambiguity of Dual Inheritance Theory
  • Cultural Homogeneity Is Overrated ...
  • "Simple Heuristics that Make Us Smart"[—]Really?
  • Docility: Does Compulsive Imitation Breed Altruism?
  • The Case for Flexible Imitation
  • Imitation: the Key that Unlocks Every Door?
  • Conformity and Deference: Psychological Mechanisms or Social Facts?
  • Cultural Diffusion in a Population of Flexible Imitators
  • Negative Informational Cascades Are Short or Rare
  • Waves of Compulsive Imitation: Often Evoked, Seldom Documented
  • The Influence of Influentials: Tautology or Misunderstanding?
  • Closing the Case against the Imitation Hypothesis
  • ... Yet Homogeneity Remains a Heavily Influential Hypothesis
  • Transmission Is Easy, Diffusion Is Hard
  • There Is No Inertia for Transmission
  • Why a Few Transmission Episodes Do Not Make a Diffusion Chain
  • Transmission Fidelity Is Not the Problem
  • For Transmission, Quantity Matters More than Quality
  • Cultural Transmission Is No Chinese Whispers Game
  • A Tradition Must Be Carried by Many Robust Diffusion Chains
  • Redundancy and Repetition Make Diffusion Chains Less Fragile
  • Traditions Must Proliferate in Order to Survive
  • Stability and Success Go Together
  • A Quantitative and Abstract View of Culture
  • Why Do Traditions Proliferate?
  • Accessibility: Certain Populations Make Contacts Easier
  • Many Ways to Proliferate, Several Types of Diffusion Chains
  • Cultural Selection[—]Many Are Called, Few Are Chosen
  • Traditions Survive Cultural Selection by Being Attractive
  • Attraction Can Be Linked to a Restricted Context, or More General
  • Traditions Are Appealing in Many Ways, Not All of Them Cognitive
  • Transmission Is Not Memorization, Culture Is Not Collective Memory
  • When Does Psychology Drive Culture?
  • Politeness Norms Last Longer if They Tap into Our Sense of Disgust
  • What Is Cultural Transmission?
  • Among the Kwaio, Beliefs about Spirits Survived by Being Intuitive
  • Generally Attractive Traditions Do Not Always Prevail
  • How the Vagaries of Diffusion Dilute General Attraction
  • Local Attraction Can Override General Attraction, Locally
  • General Attraction Prevails in Long and Narrow Diffusion Chains
  • For Instance, Widely Diffused Languages Tend to Be Easier on the Mind
  • The Benefit of Moving across Scales When Looking at Culture
  • "That Constant Stream of Recruits to Mankind"
  • Demographic Generations Are Not Social Generations
  • How to Link Humans Scattered across Time
  • Distinguishing Diffusion and Transmission
  • How Generational Overlap Makes Diffusion Easier
  • Demographic and Social Obstacles to Transmission
  • Everything Your Parents Did Not Teach You about Culture
  • Why Do Children Have Traditions?
  • The Lost World of Children's Peer Culture
  • Children's Traditions Are Not Vestigial Adult Practices
  • They Are Mostly Transmitted from Child to Child
  • They Are Children's Games, and They Look Like It
  • They Are at Least as Durable as Cross-Generational Traditions
  • They Are Homogenic and Share a Common Fate
  • Transmission and Invention Are Not Opposites
  • What Makes Children's Peer Culture Last?
  • Traditionalism Is Not What Took Children's Culture across Time
  • Neither Does Memorability Preserve Children's Rhymes
  • Children's Traditions Were Selected to Proliferate
  • Generational Turnover Need Not Impair Cultural Survival
  • Three Clues for One Puzzle
  • What Is Cultural Accumulation?
  • "Cumulative Culture" Is an Avatar of Evolutionary Gradualism
  • Faithfully Replicated Small Changes Cannot Explain Everything
  • Traditions Often Endure without Improving...
Control code
ocn922640465
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190210519
Isbn Type
(electronic book)
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)922640465

Library Locations

    • InternetBorrow it
      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
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