Coverart for item
The Resource Hired guns : views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sarah K. Cotton ... [et al.]

Hired guns : views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sarah K. Cotton ... [et al.]

Label
Hired guns : views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom
Title
Hired guns
Title remainder
views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom
Statement of responsibility
Sarah K. Cotton ... [et al.]
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Cotton, Sarah K
  • Smith Richardson Foundation
  • Rand Corporation
Series statement
RAND Corporation monograph series
Series volume
MG-987-SRF
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Postwar reconstruction
  • Private military companies
  • Private security services
  • Government contractors
  • Contracting out
  • Government contractors
  • Contracting out
Label
Hired guns : views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sarah K. Cotton ... [et al.]
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "Sponsored by the Smith Richardson Foundation."
  • "RAND National Security Research Division."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 109-115)
Contents
Chapter One. Introduction -- What Are the Costs and Benefits of Armed Contractors to the U.S. Mission in Iraq? -- Our Approach -- Survey Instrument Development, Sampling Procedures, and Other Data Sources -- Roadmap of the Monograph -- Chapter Two. Private Military and Security Contractors Are Not a New Phenomenon: A Brief History of Military Privatization -- Private Military and Security Contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom -- Contractors' Legal Status Is Opaque -- Chapter Three. Do Private Security Contractors Have a Negative Impact on Military Retention and Morale? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Having a Detrimental Impact on Military Retention and Morale -- Chapter Four. Have Private Security Contractors Had an Adverse Effect on Local Iraqis' Perceptions of the Entire Occupying Force Because of the Legal Impunity with Which They Operated in Iraq Prior to 2009? -- Confirmed Incidents of Armed Contractors Firing on Iraqi Civilians -- Most Military and Diplomatic Personnel Do Not View Armed Contractors as "Running Wild" in Iraq, but a Considerable Number of Both Groups Do Report Troubling Incidents Involving Poor PSC Behavior Toward Iraqi Civilians -- Reforms Appear to Have Had a Positive Impact Thus Far -- Chapter Five. Is There a Relative Lack of Unit Cohesion and Systematic Coordination Between Private Security Contractors and the Military? -- Sizable Minorities of Military and Diplomatic Personnel Indicate That Coordination Problems Between Contractors and the Military Are Not Absent -- Chapter Six. Do Private Security Contractors Play a Valuable Supporting Role to the U.S. Military as a Force Multipler? -- Both Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Force Multipliers, but a Considerable Minority of Respondents Feels Differently -- Chapter Seven. Do Private Security Contractors Provide Skills and Services That the Armed forces Lack? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Valuable Skills -- Chapter Eight. Do Private Security Contractors Provide Vital Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Necessary Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services -- Chapter Nine. Summary of Findings and policy Recommendations -- Recommendations -- Duties Best Filled by Contractors -- Appendixes -- A. Methodology -- B. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to Members of the Military -- C. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to State Department Personnel
Control code
ocn608687394
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xxvi, 115 p.
Isbn
9780833049827
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2010015412
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)608687394
Label
Hired guns : views about armed contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sarah K. Cotton ... [et al.]
Publication
Note
  • "Sponsored by the Smith Richardson Foundation."
  • "RAND National Security Research Division."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 109-115)
Contents
Chapter One. Introduction -- What Are the Costs and Benefits of Armed Contractors to the U.S. Mission in Iraq? -- Our Approach -- Survey Instrument Development, Sampling Procedures, and Other Data Sources -- Roadmap of the Monograph -- Chapter Two. Private Military and Security Contractors Are Not a New Phenomenon: A Brief History of Military Privatization -- Private Military and Security Contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom -- Contractors' Legal Status Is Opaque -- Chapter Three. Do Private Security Contractors Have a Negative Impact on Military Retention and Morale? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Having a Detrimental Impact on Military Retention and Morale -- Chapter Four. Have Private Security Contractors Had an Adverse Effect on Local Iraqis' Perceptions of the Entire Occupying Force Because of the Legal Impunity with Which They Operated in Iraq Prior to 2009? -- Confirmed Incidents of Armed Contractors Firing on Iraqi Civilians -- Most Military and Diplomatic Personnel Do Not View Armed Contractors as "Running Wild" in Iraq, but a Considerable Number of Both Groups Do Report Troubling Incidents Involving Poor PSC Behavior Toward Iraqi Civilians -- Reforms Appear to Have Had a Positive Impact Thus Far -- Chapter Five. Is There a Relative Lack of Unit Cohesion and Systematic Coordination Between Private Security Contractors and the Military? -- Sizable Minorities of Military and Diplomatic Personnel Indicate That Coordination Problems Between Contractors and the Military Are Not Absent -- Chapter Six. Do Private Security Contractors Play a Valuable Supporting Role to the U.S. Military as a Force Multipler? -- Both Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Force Multipliers, but a Considerable Minority of Respondents Feels Differently -- Chapter Seven. Do Private Security Contractors Provide Skills and Services That the Armed forces Lack? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Valuable Skills -- Chapter Eight. Do Private Security Contractors Provide Vital Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services? -- Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Necessary Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services -- Chapter Nine. Summary of Findings and policy Recommendations -- Recommendations -- Duties Best Filled by Contractors -- Appendixes -- A. Methodology -- B. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to Members of the Military -- C. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to State Department Personnel
Control code
ocn608687394
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xxvi, 115 p.
Isbn
9780833049827
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2010015412
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)608687394

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