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The Resource Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations, Brian A. Jackson, Kay Sullivan Faith, Henry H. Willis

Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations, Brian A. Jackson, Kay Sullivan Faith, Henry H. Willis

Label
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations
Title
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations
Statement of responsibility
Brian A. Jackson, Kay Sullivan Faith, Henry H. Willis
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The ability to measure emergency preparedness - to predict the likely performance of emergency response systems in future events - is critical for policy analysis in homeland security. Yet it remains difficult to know how prepared a response system is to deal with large-scale incidents, whether it be a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or industrial or transportation accident. This research draws on the fields of systems analysis and engineering to apply the concept of system reliability to the evaluation of emergency response systems. The authors describe a method for modeling an emergency response system; identifying how individual parts of the system might fail; and assessing the likelihood of each failure and the severity of its effects on the overall response effort. The authors walk the reader through two applications of this method: a simplified example in which responders must deliver medical treatment to a certain number of people in a specified time window, and a more complex scenario involving the release of chlorine gas. The authors also describe an exploratory analysis in which they parsed a set of after-action reports describing real-world incidents, to demonstrate how this method can be used to quantitatively analyze data on past response performance. The authors conclude with a discussion of how this method of measuring emergency response system reliability could inform policy discussion of emergency preparedness, how system reliability might be improved, and the costs of doing so. --From publisher description
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1972-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jackson, Brian A.
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Faith, Kay Sullivan
  • Willis, Henry H
  • United States
  • RAND Homeland Security and Defense Center
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Emergency management
  • Preparedness
  • Incident command systems
  • Assistance in emergencies
  • Emergency communication systems
Label
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations, Brian A. Jackson, Kay Sullivan Faith, Henry H. Willis
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "Prepared for the Federal Emergency Management Agency."
  • "RAND Homeland Security and Defense Center."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-199)
Contents
ch. One Introduction: Measurement and Emergency Preparedness -- Public Expectations and Our (Imperfect) Ability to Measure Emergency Preparedness -- Response Reliability as a Different Approach to Preparedness Assessment -- About This Study and This Document -- ch. Two Defining and Demonstrating Response Reliability Analysis -- Defining the Analytical Process for Response Reliability Assessment -- Component and System Reliability Analysis: An Overview -- Adapting Reliability Analysis Techniques to the Evaluation of Emergency Response Systems -- A Simplified Response Example for Defining and Illustrating Response Reliability -- Step One Define and Map the System -- Step Two Identify Failure Modes -- Step Three Assess the Probability of Occurrence of Different Failure Modes -- Step Four Assess the Failure Mode Effects and Their Severity -- Exploring Quantitative Representations of Response System Relibility -- Response Reliability Measures Applied to Preparedness Policy Problems -- Priotizing Possible Preparedness Investments -- Making Trade-Offs Between Actions to Improve Performance for Large-Scale Incidents Versus Smaller-Scale, More Common Events -- Comparing the Cost-Effectiveness of Different Preparedness Improvement Options -- How Much Preparedness---and Response Reliability---Is Enough? -- ch. Three Describing a Chlorine Release Scenario and Relevant Response Parameters -- Describing a Chlorine Release Scenario -- Considering the Capabilities and Requirements for Responding to a Chlorine Release -- ch. Four A Simplified Model of an Emergency Response to a Chlorine Release -- Top-Level Structure of Our Model of a Chlorine Response -- Detailed Discussion of Two Exemplary Model Components -- System-Level Incident Management -- Response to Victims' Needs -- Discussion -- ch. Five Exploring What can Go Wrong During a Chlorine Response Operation: Identifying Relevant Failure Modes -- Building a Failure Tree for a Response Operation -- Overview of Our Chlorine Response Failure Trees -- Detailed Discussion of Two Exemplary Failure Trees -- Establish and Operate Emergency Operations Center -- Medical Treatment and Transport -- Discussion -- ch. Six Assessing the Probability, Effects, and Severity of Failure Modes: An Exploratory Analysis Using Response After-Action Reports -- Exploring Failure Modes' Probability of Occurrence -- Description of the After-Action Report Dataset -- Data Analysis -- Results -- Discussion -- Exploring Failure Modes' Effects and Severity -- Response Interdependecies and Failure Consequences -- Considering Individual Failure Effects and Severity in Our Chlorine Response Analysis -- Looking at Effects and Potential Severity in One Response Case Study -- Discussion -- ch. Seven Concluding Observations -- APPENDIXES -- A. Approximating Response Reliability Curves -- B. Correspondence Between the Chlorine Response Model Used in This Analysis and Other Ways of Categorizing or Organizing Response Operations -- C. Description of Components of the RAND Chlorine Response Model Not Covered in the Text -- D. Failure Trees for All Elements of the Response Model -- E. Counts of Failure Modes Identified per Analyzed After-Action Report -- F. List of After-Action Reports Reviewed and Analyzed
Control code
13415362
Isbn
9780833050052
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2010024680
System control number
(OCoLC)642510855
Label
Evaluating the reliability of emergency response systems for large-scale incident operations, Brian A. Jackson, Kay Sullivan Faith, Henry H. Willis
Publication
Note
  • "Prepared for the Federal Emergency Management Agency."
  • "RAND Homeland Security and Defense Center."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-199)
Contents
ch. One Introduction: Measurement and Emergency Preparedness -- Public Expectations and Our (Imperfect) Ability to Measure Emergency Preparedness -- Response Reliability as a Different Approach to Preparedness Assessment -- About This Study and This Document -- ch. Two Defining and Demonstrating Response Reliability Analysis -- Defining the Analytical Process for Response Reliability Assessment -- Component and System Reliability Analysis: An Overview -- Adapting Reliability Analysis Techniques to the Evaluation of Emergency Response Systems -- A Simplified Response Example for Defining and Illustrating Response Reliability -- Step One Define and Map the System -- Step Two Identify Failure Modes -- Step Three Assess the Probability of Occurrence of Different Failure Modes -- Step Four Assess the Failure Mode Effects and Their Severity -- Exploring Quantitative Representations of Response System Relibility -- Response Reliability Measures Applied to Preparedness Policy Problems -- Priotizing Possible Preparedness Investments -- Making Trade-Offs Between Actions to Improve Performance for Large-Scale Incidents Versus Smaller-Scale, More Common Events -- Comparing the Cost-Effectiveness of Different Preparedness Improvement Options -- How Much Preparedness---and Response Reliability---Is Enough? -- ch. Three Describing a Chlorine Release Scenario and Relevant Response Parameters -- Describing a Chlorine Release Scenario -- Considering the Capabilities and Requirements for Responding to a Chlorine Release -- ch. Four A Simplified Model of an Emergency Response to a Chlorine Release -- Top-Level Structure of Our Model of a Chlorine Response -- Detailed Discussion of Two Exemplary Model Components -- System-Level Incident Management -- Response to Victims' Needs -- Discussion -- ch. Five Exploring What can Go Wrong During a Chlorine Response Operation: Identifying Relevant Failure Modes -- Building a Failure Tree for a Response Operation -- Overview of Our Chlorine Response Failure Trees -- Detailed Discussion of Two Exemplary Failure Trees -- Establish and Operate Emergency Operations Center -- Medical Treatment and Transport -- Discussion -- ch. Six Assessing the Probability, Effects, and Severity of Failure Modes: An Exploratory Analysis Using Response After-Action Reports -- Exploring Failure Modes' Probability of Occurrence -- Description of the After-Action Report Dataset -- Data Analysis -- Results -- Discussion -- Exploring Failure Modes' Effects and Severity -- Response Interdependecies and Failure Consequences -- Considering Individual Failure Effects and Severity in Our Chlorine Response Analysis -- Looking at Effects and Potential Severity in One Response Case Study -- Discussion -- ch. Seven Concluding Observations -- APPENDIXES -- A. Approximating Response Reliability Curves -- B. Correspondence Between the Chlorine Response Model Used in This Analysis and Other Ways of Categorizing or Organizing Response Operations -- C. Description of Components of the RAND Chlorine Response Model Not Covered in the Text -- D. Failure Trees for All Elements of the Response Model -- E. Counts of Failure Modes Identified per Analyzed After-Action Report -- F. List of After-Action Reports Reviewed and Analyzed
Control code
13415362
Isbn
9780833050052
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2010024680
System control number
(OCoLC)642510855

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