The Resource Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions : a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University, Ong Teck Ann

Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions : a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University, Ong Teck Ann

Label
Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions : a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University
Title
Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions
Title remainder
a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University
Statement of responsibility
Ong Teck Ann
Creator
Contributor
Author
Degree granting institution
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Particle-filled suspension is considered a suitable material for applications in three dimensional food printing. The key characteristic for a suitable material is being able to flow easily during dispensing stage and then set rapidly to retain its structure. Little is known about the effect of particle volume fraction, in conjunction with the continuous phase viscoelastic properties, on the particle maximum volume fraction, yield stress and recovery properties of the suspension. The effect of particle volume fraction and the flow behavior of the continuous phase in the suspension's rheological properties were studied using rotational and oscillatory measurements. The aim is to provide fundamental rheological data for the development of material suitable for applications in 3D printing. In this study disperse particle microcrystalline cellulose MCC (D [4,3] = 45.4 (SD=1.3)) at varied particle volume fraction dispersed in either 80% w/w glycerin solution (Newtonian behavior) or xanthan gum solutions at 0.1, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0% w/w (non-Newtonian behavior) were used to prepare the suspension samples. The results showed that as the particle volume fraction increased, the suspension's rheological behavior deviated from the continuous phase i.e. increased magnitude in suspension viscosity and storage modulus, and exhibited yield stress and shear thinning behavior. It was observed that the effect of particle volume fraction was less pronouned in xanthan gum solutions (especially at 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0% w.w. xanthan) as compared to glycerin solution. Furthermore, the yield stress of xanthan gum solutions decreased with increasing particle volume fraction, suggesting two probable interactions between xanthan molecules and MCC particles: (1) restriction of particle mobility by the highly viscous xanthan solution, thereby retarded the hydrodynamic properties of particle and (2) disruption of xanthan gum intermolecular networks by MCC particles resulting in a decrease in yield stress. In addition, the maximum particle volume fraction and particle intrinsic viscosity of the suspensions had decreasing trend with increasing xanthan gum concentration, except for a peak increase at 0.5% w/w xanthan gum. A mechanism based on particle hydrodynamic radius in presence of xanthan gum and the packing of particles was proposed to account for this effect. Lastly, the increase in particle volume fraction increased the rate of relative storage modulus recovered after shear. This effect was more obvious in glycerin and 0.1% xanthan gum solution than in 0.5 and 0.8 % xanthan gum solutions. In the context of the application in 3D printing, this study showed that the effect of volume fraction was more obvious in a Newtonian continuous phase. However, increased volume fraction of particles in xanthan gum solution (non-Newtonian behavior) did not result in the same extent of viscosity increase when particles were dispered in a Newtonian continuous phase--Abstract
Cataloging source
PU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ong, Teck Ann
Degree
BFoodTech(Hons)
Dissertation year
2014
Granting institution
Massey University
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Massey University
  • Massey University
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Food emulsions
  • Colloids
  • Hydrocolloids
  • Rheology
  • Three-dimensional printing
Target audience
specialized
Label
Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions : a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University, Ong Teck Ann
Instantiates
Production
Note
  • At head of title: Massey University, Singapore
  • At head of cover title: Massey University Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health final year project report
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Abstract -- Introduction -- Literature review. Classification of suspensions. Forces influencing particle flow ; Rheological model for suspensions ; Rheology of suspensions ; Suspension materials ;Rheological analysis ; Particle density ; Artefact - Particle sedimentation -- Materials and methods -- Results and discussion. Continuous phase characterization ; Viscosity curves ; Linear viscoelastic region ; Mechanical spectra ; Yield stress from oscillatory measurement ; Maximum volume fraction and intrinsic viscosity ; Structure recovery ; Summary of particle and continuous phase effect -- Conclusion -- Recommendations
Dimensions
30 cm
Extent
x, 60 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Effect of insoluble volume fraction on rheological properties of mixed colloidal suspensions : a project report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Food Technology (Honours) of Massey University, Ong Teck Ann
Production
Note
  • At head of title: Massey University, Singapore
  • At head of cover title: Massey University Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health final year project report
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Abstract -- Introduction -- Literature review. Classification of suspensions. Forces influencing particle flow ; Rheological model for suspensions ; Rheology of suspensions ; Suspension materials ;Rheological analysis ; Particle density ; Artefact - Particle sedimentation -- Materials and methods -- Results and discussion. Continuous phase characterization ; Viscosity curves ; Linear viscoelastic region ; Mechanical spectra ; Yield stress from oscillatory measurement ; Maximum volume fraction and intrinsic viscosity ; Structure recovery ; Summary of particle and continuous phase effect -- Conclusion -- Recommendations
Dimensions
30 cm
Extent
x, 60 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations

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