Coverart for item
The Resource Economic objects and the objects of economics, Peter Róna, László Zsolnai, editors

Economic objects and the objects of economics, Peter Róna, László Zsolnai, editors

Label
Economic objects and the objects of economics
Title
Economic objects and the objects of economics
Statement of responsibility
Peter Róna, László Zsolnai, editors
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Dewey number
330
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Róna, Peter,
  • Zsolnai, László,
Series statement
Virtues and economics,
Series volume
volume 3
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Economics
  • Economics
Label
Economic objects and the objects of economics, Peter Róna, László Zsolnai, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Intro; Preface; Acknowledgement; Contents; About the Contributors; Part I: Introduction; Chapter 1: Ontology and Economics; References; Part II: The Importance of Ontology; Chapter 2: Objects of Nature and Objects of Thought; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Value Neutrality and Incommensurability; 2.3 Object Formation; 2.4 Measurability; 2.5 Measuring; 2.6 Model Making; 2.6.1 Isolation; 2.6.2 Idealization and Abstraction; References; Chapter 3: Positioning and the Nature of Social Objects; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Cambridge Social Ontology
  • 3.3 Ontological Neglect within Mainstream Economics and its Consequences3.4 The Firm and the Corporation as Positioned Communities; 3.5 Conclusion; References; Chapter 4: Central Fallacies of Modern Economics; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Twenty Fallacies of Modern Economics; 4.3 Conclusion; References; Part III: Ontology of Modern Economics; Chapter 5: Social Scientific Naturalism Revisited; 5.1 Historical Introduction; 5.2 Ambiguities: Are Social Inquiries "Like" the Natural Sciences?; 5.3 What Makes Social Scientific Naturalism Worth Probing?
  • 5.4 Can the Behavior of Human Beings Be the Subject of a Science?5.5 The "Verstehen" Requirement; 5.6 The Nitty Gritty Significance of the "Verstehen" Requirement; 5.7 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6: Is Economics a Moral Science?; 6.1 Definitional Aspects of the Debate; 6.2 Marshall's Definition and Methodology; 6.3 Robbins' Definition and Methodology; 6.4 The Moral Philosophical Foundation of Classical Economics; 6.5 What Is to Be Done?; 6.6 Conclusion; References
  • Chapter 7: New Theoretical City or Dispersed Tribes? An Exploration Journey through Contemporary Heterodox Economics and Methodology7.1 The Urban Territory of the Mainstream: Methodological Critics, Benevolent Interpreters, Theoretical-­Experimental Critics, Performative detectives and Saboteurs; 7.2 In the Wild Forests of Heterodoxy: Ancient Tribes, New Nomadic Groups and a pro-Independence Project; 7.3 In the New Suburban Neighbors of Experimental and Empirical Research: Experimental Practitioners, Inductive Developers and Neoclassical Explorers
  • 7.4 After the Journey: Questions, Positive Possibilities and Crossroads7.4.1 Questions and Opinions; 7.4.2 Positive Possibilities; 7.4.3 Final Crossroads; 7.5 Conclusion: A New Theoretical City?; References; Part IV: Temporality, Reactivity and Crowding; Chapter 8: Rational Choice Theory and Backward-­Looking Motives; References; Chapter 9: Time-Value in Economics; 9.1 Time-Value as Fact; 9.2 Normative Dimension; 9.2.1 Time-Value as an Interpretive Concept; 9.3 Efficiency Scenarios; 9.3.1 Opposing Viewpoint Considered; 9.4 An Interpretive Standpoint; 9.5 Conclusion; References
Control code
on1049802549
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319945293
Level of compression
unknown
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1049802549
Label
Economic objects and the objects of economics, Peter Róna, László Zsolnai, editors
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Intro; Preface; Acknowledgement; Contents; About the Contributors; Part I: Introduction; Chapter 1: Ontology and Economics; References; Part II: The Importance of Ontology; Chapter 2: Objects of Nature and Objects of Thought; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Value Neutrality and Incommensurability; 2.3 Object Formation; 2.4 Measurability; 2.5 Measuring; 2.6 Model Making; 2.6.1 Isolation; 2.6.2 Idealization and Abstraction; References; Chapter 3: Positioning and the Nature of Social Objects; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Cambridge Social Ontology
  • 3.3 Ontological Neglect within Mainstream Economics and its Consequences3.4 The Firm and the Corporation as Positioned Communities; 3.5 Conclusion; References; Chapter 4: Central Fallacies of Modern Economics; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Twenty Fallacies of Modern Economics; 4.3 Conclusion; References; Part III: Ontology of Modern Economics; Chapter 5: Social Scientific Naturalism Revisited; 5.1 Historical Introduction; 5.2 Ambiguities: Are Social Inquiries "Like" the Natural Sciences?; 5.3 What Makes Social Scientific Naturalism Worth Probing?
  • 5.4 Can the Behavior of Human Beings Be the Subject of a Science?5.5 The "Verstehen" Requirement; 5.6 The Nitty Gritty Significance of the "Verstehen" Requirement; 5.7 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6: Is Economics a Moral Science?; 6.1 Definitional Aspects of the Debate; 6.2 Marshall's Definition and Methodology; 6.3 Robbins' Definition and Methodology; 6.4 The Moral Philosophical Foundation of Classical Economics; 6.5 What Is to Be Done?; 6.6 Conclusion; References
  • Chapter 7: New Theoretical City or Dispersed Tribes? An Exploration Journey through Contemporary Heterodox Economics and Methodology7.1 The Urban Territory of the Mainstream: Methodological Critics, Benevolent Interpreters, Theoretical-­Experimental Critics, Performative detectives and Saboteurs; 7.2 In the Wild Forests of Heterodoxy: Ancient Tribes, New Nomadic Groups and a pro-Independence Project; 7.3 In the New Suburban Neighbors of Experimental and Empirical Research: Experimental Practitioners, Inductive Developers and Neoclassical Explorers
  • 7.4 After the Journey: Questions, Positive Possibilities and Crossroads7.4.1 Questions and Opinions; 7.4.2 Positive Possibilities; 7.4.3 Final Crossroads; 7.5 Conclusion: A New Theoretical City?; References; Part IV: Temporality, Reactivity and Crowding; Chapter 8: Rational Choice Theory and Backward-­Looking Motives; References; Chapter 9: Time-Value in Economics; 9.1 Time-Value as Fact; 9.2 Normative Dimension; 9.2.1 Time-Value as an Interpretive Concept; 9.3 Efficiency Scenarios; 9.3.1 Opposing Viewpoint Considered; 9.4 An Interpretive Standpoint; 9.5 Conclusion; References
Control code
on1049802549
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319945293
Level of compression
unknown
Note
SpringerLink
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1049802549

Library Locations

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