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The Resource Discursive pragmatics, edited by Jan Zienkowski, Jan-Ola Östman, Jef Verschueren

Discursive pragmatics, edited by Jan Zienkowski, Jan-Ola Östman, Jef Verschueren

Label
Discursive pragmatics
Title
Discursive pragmatics
Statement of responsibility
edited by Jan Zienkowski, Jan-Ola Östman, Jef Verschueren
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Zienkowski, Jan
  • Östman, Jan-Ola
  • Verschueren, Jef
Series statement
Handbook of pragmatics highlights
Series volume
v. 8
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Discourse analysis
  • Pragmatics
  • Semantics
Label
Discursive pragmatics, edited by Jan Zienkowski, Jan-Ola Östman, Jef Verschueren
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Attitude - the activation of positive or negative positioning
  • "Lesarten" approach
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Enonciation: French pragmatic approach(es)
  • Eija Suomela-Salmi
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Historical overview - from the pre-theoretical to the present phase
  • 2.1.
  • 2.1.1.
  • Origins and the pre-theoretical phase
  • 2.2.
  • First phase: Forerunners
  • 2.2.1.
  • Charles Bally (1865-1947)
  • 2.2.2.
  • Gustave Guillaume (1883-1960)
  • 2.3.
  • Second phase: Main theoretical foundation
  • 2.3.1.
  • Affect
  • Emile Benveniste (1902-1976)
  • 2.4.
  • Third phase: Modern developments
  • 2.4.1.
  • Antoine Culioli (born in 1924)
  • 2.4.2.
  • Oswald Ducrot (born in 1930)
  • 2.4.3.
  • Jacqueline Authier-Revuz (born in 1940)
  • 3.
  • 2.1.2.
  • Some basic notions
  • 3.1.
  • Enunciation and enunciator
  • 3.2.
  • Situation/Context
  • 3.3.
  • Subjectivity and deixis
  • 3.4.
  • Reported speech
  • 3.5.
  • Judgement
  • Modality and modalization
  • 3.6.
  • Modalities of enunciation (modalites d'enonciation)
  • 3.7.
  • Utterance modalities (modalites d'enonce)
  • Figures of Speech
  • Manfred Kienpointner
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • 2.1.3.
  • Ancient rhetoric
  • 3.
  • Contemporary treatments of FSP
  • 3.1.
  • Definition of FSP
  • 3.2.
  • Classification of FSP
  • 4.
  • Across the lines of discipline: The cognitive and communicative role of FSP
  • Genre
  • Appreciation
  • Anna Solin
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Historical precedents
  • 3.
  • Genre research in language studies
  • 3.1.
  • Sydney School
  • 3.2.
  • 2.1.4.
  • New Rhetoric
  • 3.3.
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • 4.
  • Issues and debates
  • 4.1.
  • Genre as class
  • 4.2.
  • Stability of genres
  • Humor
  • Modes of activation - direct and implied
  • Salvatore Attardo
  • 1.
  • Introduction and definition
  • 2.
  • Referential and verbal humor
  • 3.
  • Semantics
  • 3.1.
  • The isotopy-disjunction model
  • 3.2.
  • 2.1.5.
  • The script-based semantic theory of humor
  • 3.3.
  • ̀Longer' texts
  • 4.
  • The cooperative principle and humor
  • 4.1.
  • Grice and Gricean analyses
  • 4.2.
  • Humor as non-bona-fide communication
  • 4.3.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Typological criteria
  • Relevance-theoretic approaches to humor
  • 4.4.
  • Informativeness approach to jokes
  • 4.5.
  • Two-stage processing of humor
  • 5.
  • Conversation analysis
  • 5.1.
  • Canned jokes in conversation
  • 5.1.1.
  • 2.1.6.
  • Preface
  • 5.1.2.
  • Telling
  • 5.1.3.
  • Response
  • 5.2.
  • Conversational humor
  • 5.2.1.
  • Functional conversational analyses
  • 5.2.2.
  • The interplay between the attitudinal modes
  • Quantitative conversational analyses
  • 6.
  • Sociolinguistics of humor
  • 6.1.
  • Gender differences
  • 6.2.
  • Ethnicity and humor
  • 7.
  • Computational humor
  • 8.
  • 2.2.
  • Cognitive linguistics and humor
  • 9.
  • Conclusion
  • Intertextuality
  • Stef Slembrouck
  • 1.
  • From ̀literature' to ̀text as a productivity which inserts itself into history'
  • 2.
  • Text linguistics on ̀textuality'
  • 3.
  • Intersubjective stance
  • Dialogism and heteroglossia in a social-diachronic theory of discourse
  • 4.
  • Volosinov, pragmatics and conversation analysis: Sequential implicativeness and the translation of the other's perspective
  • 5.
  • Synoptic and participatory views of human activity: Bakhtin, Bourdieu, sociolinguistic legitimacy (and the body)
  • 6.
  • Natural histories of discourse: Recontextualization/entextualization and textual ideologies
  • Manipulation
  • Paul Chilton
  • 1.
  • 3.
  • The ancient technique of rhetoric
  • 2.
  • The twentieth-century nightmare of ̀thought control'
  • 3.
  • Manipulation is not inherent in language structure
  • 4.
  • So let's look at thought and social action
  • 4.1.
  • Drumming it in
  • 4.2.
  • Attitudinal assessment - a brief outline
  • Ideas that spread
  • 5.
  • What might override the cheat-checker?
  • 6.
  • Conclusion: Manipulation and counter-manipulation
  • Narrative
  • Alexandra Georgakopoulou
  • 1.
  • Narrative as a mode of communication
  • 2.
  • 3.1.
  • Referential properties
  • 3.
  • Textual properties
  • 3.1.
  • Narrative organization
  • 3.2.
  • Narrative evaluation
  • 4.
  • Contextual properties
  • Polyphony
  • Affect
  • Eddy Roulet
  • 1.
  • Preliminaries
  • 2.
  • Polyphony in Bakhtin's work
  • 3.
  • Polyphony in Ducrot's work
  • 4.
  • The description of the polyphonic organization of discourse
  • 5.
  • 3.2.
  • The interrelations between polyphony and other dimensions of discourse structures
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • Pragmatic markers
  • Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen
  • 1.
  • The tradition and the present state of research on pragmatic markers
  • 2.
  • Defining the field
  • 3.
  • Appraisal
  • Judgement
  • The terminology: Pragmatic marker or discourse marker?
  • 4.
  • Classification
  • 5.
  • Pragmatic markers and multifunctionality
  • 6.
  • Theoretical approaches to the study of pragmatic markers
  • 7.
  • Methodology
  • 8.
  • 3.3.
  • Pragmatic markers in the languages of the world
  • 9.
  • The diachronic study of pragmatic markers
  • 10.
  • The contrastive study of pragmatic markers
  • 11.
  • Pragmatic markers in translation studies
  • 12.
  • Pragmatic markers in native versus non-native speaker communication
  • 13.
  • Appreciation
  • Pragmatic markers and sociolinguistic aspects
  • 14.
  • Pragmatic markers and the future
  • Public discourse
  • Srikant Sarangi
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 1.1.
  • Multiple readings of ̀publicness'
  • 2.
  • 4.
  • The situation-talk dialectic: ̀public' as a feature of setting vs. ̀public' as a feature of talk
  • 2.1.
  • (Socio)linguistic markers of public discourse
  • 2.2.
  • Interaction-based approach
  • 3.
  • Goffman and the public order
  • 4.
  • Habermas and the public sphere
  • 5.
  • Engagement: An overview
  • Transformation of the public sphere: Public discourse as mediated communication
  • 5.1.
  • The state's role in the conflation of public and private discourses in contemporary societies
  • 5.2.
  • Surveillance and control: Information exchange as a site of struggle
  • 6.
  • Pragmatic theories of information exchange and the public sphere: Towards a social pragmatics
  • Text and discourse linguistics
  • Tuija Virtanen
  • 1.
  • 4.1.
  • On terminology
  • 2.
  • Historical overview
  • 3.
  • Important fields of study
  • 3.1.
  • Information structure
  • 3.2.
  • Cohesion
  • 3.3.
  • Dialogic contraction and expansion
  • Coherence
  • 3.4.
  • Grounding
  • 3.5.
  • Discourse types and genres
  • 4.
  • Other trends
  • 5.
  • Applications
  • 5.1.
  • 4.2.
  • Practical applications
  • 5.2.
  • Acquisitional and diachronic studies
  • 6.
  • Final remarks
  • Text linguistics
  • Robert de Beaugrande
  • 1.
  • The rise of text linguistics
  • 2.
  • Further resources of dialogic expansion
  • Some central issues
  • 4.2.1.
  • Peter R.R. White
  • Acknowledge
  • 4.2.2.
  • Entertain
  • 4.3.
  • Further resources of dialogic contraction
  • 4.3.1.
  • Pronounce
  • 4.3.2.
  • Concur
  • 4.3.3.
  • 1.
  • Disclaim (Deny and Counter)
  • 4.3.4.
  • Disclaim: Deny (negation)
  • 4.3.5.
  • Disclaim: Counter
  • 4.4.
  • Engagement resources - summary
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Cohesion and coherence
  • Introduction
  • Wolfram Bublitz
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Focus on form: Cohesion
  • 3.
  • Cohesion as a condition for coherence
  • 4.
  • Focus on meaning: Connectivity
  • 5.
  • 2.
  • Semantic connectivity as a condition for coherence
  • 6.
  • Coherence: A general view
  • 7.
  • A hermeneutic, context and interpretation based view of coherence
  • 8.
  • Coherence as a default assumption
  • 9.
  • Perspectives
  • Critical Linguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis
  • Overview
  • Ruth Wodak
  • 1.
  • Definitions
  • 2.
  • Historical note
  • 3.
  • Principles of CL
  • 4.
  • Trends
  • 4.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Social Semiotics
  • 4.2.
  • Òrders of discourse' and Foucauldian poststructuralism
  • 4.3.
  • The socio-cognitive model
  • 4.4.
  • Discourse-Historical approach
  • 4.5.
  • Lexicometry
  • 4.6.
Control code
ocn606787688
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiv, 307 p.
Isbn
9789027289155
Isbn Type
(eb)
Lccn
2011012728
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)606787688
Label
Discursive pragmatics, edited by Jan Zienkowski, Jan-Ola Östman, Jef Verschueren
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Attitude - the activation of positive or negative positioning
  • "Lesarten" approach
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Enonciation: French pragmatic approach(es)
  • Eija Suomela-Salmi
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Historical overview - from the pre-theoretical to the present phase
  • 2.1.
  • 2.1.1.
  • Origins and the pre-theoretical phase
  • 2.2.
  • First phase: Forerunners
  • 2.2.1.
  • Charles Bally (1865-1947)
  • 2.2.2.
  • Gustave Guillaume (1883-1960)
  • 2.3.
  • Second phase: Main theoretical foundation
  • 2.3.1.
  • Affect
  • Emile Benveniste (1902-1976)
  • 2.4.
  • Third phase: Modern developments
  • 2.4.1.
  • Antoine Culioli (born in 1924)
  • 2.4.2.
  • Oswald Ducrot (born in 1930)
  • 2.4.3.
  • Jacqueline Authier-Revuz (born in 1940)
  • 3.
  • 2.1.2.
  • Some basic notions
  • 3.1.
  • Enunciation and enunciator
  • 3.2.
  • Situation/Context
  • 3.3.
  • Subjectivity and deixis
  • 3.4.
  • Reported speech
  • 3.5.
  • Judgement
  • Modality and modalization
  • 3.6.
  • Modalities of enunciation (modalites d'enonciation)
  • 3.7.
  • Utterance modalities (modalites d'enonce)
  • Figures of Speech
  • Manfred Kienpointner
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • 2.1.3.
  • Ancient rhetoric
  • 3.
  • Contemporary treatments of FSP
  • 3.1.
  • Definition of FSP
  • 3.2.
  • Classification of FSP
  • 4.
  • Across the lines of discipline: The cognitive and communicative role of FSP
  • Genre
  • Appreciation
  • Anna Solin
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Historical precedents
  • 3.
  • Genre research in language studies
  • 3.1.
  • Sydney School
  • 3.2.
  • 2.1.4.
  • New Rhetoric
  • 3.3.
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • 4.
  • Issues and debates
  • 4.1.
  • Genre as class
  • 4.2.
  • Stability of genres
  • Humor
  • Modes of activation - direct and implied
  • Salvatore Attardo
  • 1.
  • Introduction and definition
  • 2.
  • Referential and verbal humor
  • 3.
  • Semantics
  • 3.1.
  • The isotopy-disjunction model
  • 3.2.
  • 2.1.5.
  • The script-based semantic theory of humor
  • 3.3.
  • ̀Longer' texts
  • 4.
  • The cooperative principle and humor
  • 4.1.
  • Grice and Gricean analyses
  • 4.2.
  • Humor as non-bona-fide communication
  • 4.3.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Typological criteria
  • Relevance-theoretic approaches to humor
  • 4.4.
  • Informativeness approach to jokes
  • 4.5.
  • Two-stage processing of humor
  • 5.
  • Conversation analysis
  • 5.1.
  • Canned jokes in conversation
  • 5.1.1.
  • 2.1.6.
  • Preface
  • 5.1.2.
  • Telling
  • 5.1.3.
  • Response
  • 5.2.
  • Conversational humor
  • 5.2.1.
  • Functional conversational analyses
  • 5.2.2.
  • The interplay between the attitudinal modes
  • Quantitative conversational analyses
  • 6.
  • Sociolinguistics of humor
  • 6.1.
  • Gender differences
  • 6.2.
  • Ethnicity and humor
  • 7.
  • Computational humor
  • 8.
  • 2.2.
  • Cognitive linguistics and humor
  • 9.
  • Conclusion
  • Intertextuality
  • Stef Slembrouck
  • 1.
  • From ̀literature' to ̀text as a productivity which inserts itself into history'
  • 2.
  • Text linguistics on ̀textuality'
  • 3.
  • Intersubjective stance
  • Dialogism and heteroglossia in a social-diachronic theory of discourse
  • 4.
  • Volosinov, pragmatics and conversation analysis: Sequential implicativeness and the translation of the other's perspective
  • 5.
  • Synoptic and participatory views of human activity: Bakhtin, Bourdieu, sociolinguistic legitimacy (and the body)
  • 6.
  • Natural histories of discourse: Recontextualization/entextualization and textual ideologies
  • Manipulation
  • Paul Chilton
  • 1.
  • 3.
  • The ancient technique of rhetoric
  • 2.
  • The twentieth-century nightmare of ̀thought control'
  • 3.
  • Manipulation is not inherent in language structure
  • 4.
  • So let's look at thought and social action
  • 4.1.
  • Drumming it in
  • 4.2.
  • Attitudinal assessment - a brief outline
  • Ideas that spread
  • 5.
  • What might override the cheat-checker?
  • 6.
  • Conclusion: Manipulation and counter-manipulation
  • Narrative
  • Alexandra Georgakopoulou
  • 1.
  • Narrative as a mode of communication
  • 2.
  • 3.1.
  • Referential properties
  • 3.
  • Textual properties
  • 3.1.
  • Narrative organization
  • 3.2.
  • Narrative evaluation
  • 4.
  • Contextual properties
  • Polyphony
  • Affect
  • Eddy Roulet
  • 1.
  • Preliminaries
  • 2.
  • Polyphony in Bakhtin's work
  • 3.
  • Polyphony in Ducrot's work
  • 4.
  • The description of the polyphonic organization of discourse
  • 5.
  • 3.2.
  • The interrelations between polyphony and other dimensions of discourse structures
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • Pragmatic markers
  • Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen
  • 1.
  • The tradition and the present state of research on pragmatic markers
  • 2.
  • Defining the field
  • 3.
  • Appraisal
  • Judgement
  • The terminology: Pragmatic marker or discourse marker?
  • 4.
  • Classification
  • 5.
  • Pragmatic markers and multifunctionality
  • 6.
  • Theoretical approaches to the study of pragmatic markers
  • 7.
  • Methodology
  • 8.
  • 3.3.
  • Pragmatic markers in the languages of the world
  • 9.
  • The diachronic study of pragmatic markers
  • 10.
  • The contrastive study of pragmatic markers
  • 11.
  • Pragmatic markers in translation studies
  • 12.
  • Pragmatic markers in native versus non-native speaker communication
  • 13.
  • Appreciation
  • Pragmatic markers and sociolinguistic aspects
  • 14.
  • Pragmatic markers and the future
  • Public discourse
  • Srikant Sarangi
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 1.1.
  • Multiple readings of ̀publicness'
  • 2.
  • 4.
  • The situation-talk dialectic: ̀public' as a feature of setting vs. ̀public' as a feature of talk
  • 2.1.
  • (Socio)linguistic markers of public discourse
  • 2.2.
  • Interaction-based approach
  • 3.
  • Goffman and the public order
  • 4.
  • Habermas and the public sphere
  • 5.
  • Engagement: An overview
  • Transformation of the public sphere: Public discourse as mediated communication
  • 5.1.
  • The state's role in the conflation of public and private discourses in contemporary societies
  • 5.2.
  • Surveillance and control: Information exchange as a site of struggle
  • 6.
  • Pragmatic theories of information exchange and the public sphere: Towards a social pragmatics
  • Text and discourse linguistics
  • Tuija Virtanen
  • 1.
  • 4.1.
  • On terminology
  • 2.
  • Historical overview
  • 3.
  • Important fields of study
  • 3.1.
  • Information structure
  • 3.2.
  • Cohesion
  • 3.3.
  • Dialogic contraction and expansion
  • Coherence
  • 3.4.
  • Grounding
  • 3.5.
  • Discourse types and genres
  • 4.
  • Other trends
  • 5.
  • Applications
  • 5.1.
  • 4.2.
  • Practical applications
  • 5.2.
  • Acquisitional and diachronic studies
  • 6.
  • Final remarks
  • Text linguistics
  • Robert de Beaugrande
  • 1.
  • The rise of text linguistics
  • 2.
  • Further resources of dialogic expansion
  • Some central issues
  • 4.2.1.
  • Peter R.R. White
  • Acknowledge
  • 4.2.2.
  • Entertain
  • 4.3.
  • Further resources of dialogic contraction
  • 4.3.1.
  • Pronounce
  • 4.3.2.
  • Concur
  • 4.3.3.
  • 1.
  • Disclaim (Deny and Counter)
  • 4.3.4.
  • Disclaim: Deny (negation)
  • 4.3.5.
  • Disclaim: Counter
  • 4.4.
  • Engagement resources - summary
  • 5.
  • Conclusion
  • Cohesion and coherence
  • Introduction
  • Wolfram Bublitz
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.
  • Focus on form: Cohesion
  • 3.
  • Cohesion as a condition for coherence
  • 4.
  • Focus on meaning: Connectivity
  • 5.
  • 2.
  • Semantic connectivity as a condition for coherence
  • 6.
  • Coherence: A general view
  • 7.
  • A hermeneutic, context and interpretation based view of coherence
  • 8.
  • Coherence as a default assumption
  • 9.
  • Perspectives
  • Critical Linguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis
  • Overview
  • Ruth Wodak
  • 1.
  • Definitions
  • 2.
  • Historical note
  • 3.
  • Principles of CL
  • 4.
  • Trends
  • 4.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Social Semiotics
  • 4.2.
  • Òrders of discourse' and Foucauldian poststructuralism
  • 4.3.
  • The socio-cognitive model
  • 4.4.
  • Discourse-Historical approach
  • 4.5.
  • Lexicometry
  • 4.6.
Control code
ocn606787688
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiv, 307 p.
Isbn
9789027289155
Isbn Type
(eb)
Lccn
2011012728
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)606787688

Library Locations

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      Tennent Drive, Palmerston North, Palmerston North, 4472, NZ
      -40.385340 175.617349
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