Coverart for item
The Resource Counting Americans : how the US Census classified the nation, Paul Schor ; translated by Lys Ann Weiss

Counting Americans : how the US Census classified the nation, Paul Schor ; translated by Lys Ann Weiss

Label
Counting Americans : how the US Census classified the nation
Title
Counting Americans
Title remainder
how the US Census classified the nation
Statement of responsibility
Paul Schor ; translated by Lys Ann Weiss
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Summary
Tracing the evolutions of the categories used by the US census to classify Americans from the first census (1790) to 1940, this book shows the centrality of power relations and of racial ideologies in census-taking, with an emphasis on slavery, segregation, and immigration
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Schor, Paul,
Dewey number
317.3072/3
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
Translated from the French
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weiss, Lys Ann,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
Label
Counting Americans : how the US Census classified the nation, Paul Schor ; translated by Lys Ann Weiss
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Originally published as: Compter et classer : Histoire des recensements américains by Paul Schor, Éditions de l'École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris, 2009
  • Translated from the French
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Cover; Counting Americans; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Note on Illustrations; List of Tables; Note on Terminology; Introduction; Part I The Origins of the US Census: From Enumeration of Voters and Taxpayers to "Social Statistics," 1790-​1840; 1. The Creation of the Federal Census by the Constitution of the United States: A Political Instrument; 2. The First Developments of the National Census (1800-​1830); 3. The Census of 1840: Science, Politics, and "Insanity" of Free Blacks
  • Part II Slaves, Former Slaves, Blacks, and Mulattoes: Identification of the Individual and the Statistical Segregation of Populations (1850-​1865)4. Whether to Name or Count Slaves: The Refusal of Identification; 5. Color, Race, and Origin of Slaves and Free Persons: "White," "Black," and "Mulatto" in the Censuses of 1850 and 1860; 6. Color and Status of Slaves: Legal Definition and Census Practice; 7. Census Data for 1850 and 1860 and the Defeat of the South
  • Part III The Rise of Immigration and the Racialization of Society: The Adaptation of the Census to the Diversity of the American Population (1850-​1900)8. Modernization, Standardization, and Internationalization: From the Censuses of J. C. G. Kennedy (1850 and 1860) to the First Census of Francis A. Walker (1870); 9. From Slavery to Freedom: The Future of the Black Race or Racial Mixing as Degeneration; 10. From "Mulatto" to the "One Drop Rule" (1870-​1900); 11. The Slow Integration of Indians into US Population Statistics in the Nineteenth Century
  • 12. The Chinese and Japanese in the Census: Nationalities That Are Also Races13. Immigration, Nativism, and Statistics (1850-​1900); Part IV Apogee and Decline of Ethnic Statistics (1900-​1940); 14. The Disappearance of the "Mulatto" as the End of Inquiry into the Composition of the Black Population of the United States; 15. The Question of Racial Mixing in the American Possessions: National Norms and Local Resistance; 16. New Asian Races, New Mixtures, and the "Mexican" Race: Interest in "Minor Races"; 17. From Statistics by Country of Birth to the System of National Origins
  • Part V The Population and the Census: Representation, Negotiation, and Segmentation (1900-​1940)18. The Census and African Americans Within and Outside the Bureau; 19. Women as Census Workers and as Relays in the Field; 20. Ethnic Marketing of Population Statistics; Epilogue: The Fortunes of Census Classifications (1940-​2000); Conclusion; Abbreviations; Notes; Sources and Bibliography; Index
Control code
ocn978351919
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 356 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190670856
Lccn
2017013971
Note
Oxford University Press
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)978351919
Label
Counting Americans : how the US Census classified the nation, Paul Schor ; translated by Lys Ann Weiss
Publication
Note
  • Originally published as: Compter et classer : Histoire des recensements américains by Paul Schor, Éditions de l'École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris, 2009
  • Translated from the French
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Cover; Counting Americans; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Note on Illustrations; List of Tables; Note on Terminology; Introduction; Part I The Origins of the US Census: From Enumeration of Voters and Taxpayers to "Social Statistics," 1790-​1840; 1. The Creation of the Federal Census by the Constitution of the United States: A Political Instrument; 2. The First Developments of the National Census (1800-​1830); 3. The Census of 1840: Science, Politics, and "Insanity" of Free Blacks
  • Part II Slaves, Former Slaves, Blacks, and Mulattoes: Identification of the Individual and the Statistical Segregation of Populations (1850-​1865)4. Whether to Name or Count Slaves: The Refusal of Identification; 5. Color, Race, and Origin of Slaves and Free Persons: "White," "Black," and "Mulatto" in the Censuses of 1850 and 1860; 6. Color and Status of Slaves: Legal Definition and Census Practice; 7. Census Data for 1850 and 1860 and the Defeat of the South
  • Part III The Rise of Immigration and the Racialization of Society: The Adaptation of the Census to the Diversity of the American Population (1850-​1900)8. Modernization, Standardization, and Internationalization: From the Censuses of J. C. G. Kennedy (1850 and 1860) to the First Census of Francis A. Walker (1870); 9. From Slavery to Freedom: The Future of the Black Race or Racial Mixing as Degeneration; 10. From "Mulatto" to the "One Drop Rule" (1870-​1900); 11. The Slow Integration of Indians into US Population Statistics in the Nineteenth Century
  • 12. The Chinese and Japanese in the Census: Nationalities That Are Also Races13. Immigration, Nativism, and Statistics (1850-​1900); Part IV Apogee and Decline of Ethnic Statistics (1900-​1940); 14. The Disappearance of the "Mulatto" as the End of Inquiry into the Composition of the Black Population of the United States; 15. The Question of Racial Mixing in the American Possessions: National Norms and Local Resistance; 16. New Asian Races, New Mixtures, and the "Mexican" Race: Interest in "Minor Races"; 17. From Statistics by Country of Birth to the System of National Origins
  • Part V The Population and the Census: Representation, Negotiation, and Segmentation (1900-​1940)18. The Census and African Americans Within and Outside the Bureau; 19. Women as Census Workers and as Relays in the Field; 20. Ethnic Marketing of Population Statistics; Epilogue: The Fortunes of Census Classifications (1940-​2000); Conclusion; Abbreviations; Notes; Sources and Bibliography; Index
Control code
ocn978351919
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 356 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190670856
Lccn
2017013971
Note
Oxford University Press
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)978351919

Library Locations

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