Coverart for item
The Resource Consciousness in Locke, Shelley Weinberg

Consciousness in Locke, Shelley Weinberg

Label
Consciousness in Locke
Title
Consciousness in Locke
Statement of responsibility
Shelley Weinberg
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Shelley Weinberg argues that the idea of consciousness as a form of non-evaluative self-awareness helps solve some of the thorniest issues in Locke's philosophy: in his philosophical psychology, and his theories of knowledge, personal identity, and moral agency. The model of consciousness set forth here binds these key issues with a common thread
  • "Unlike any other yet of its kind, this book argues that consciousness as a form of non-evaluative self-awareness runs through and helps to solve some of the thorniest issues in Locke's philosophy: in his philosophical psychology and in his theories of knowledge, personal identity, and moral agency. Central to the account is that perceptions of ideas are complex mental states wherein consciousness is a constituent. Such an interpretation answers charges of inconsistency in Locke's model of the mind and lends coherence to a puzzling aspect of Locke's theory of knowledge: how we know individual things (particular ideas, ourselves, and external objects) when knowledge is defined as the perception of an agreement, or relation, of ideas. In each case, consciousness helps to forge the relation, resulting in a structurally integrated account of our knowledge of particulars fully consistent with the general definition. This model also explains how we achieve the unity of consciousness with past and future selves necessary for Locke's accounts of moral responsibility and moral motivation. And with help from other of his metaphysical commitments, consciousness so interpreted allows Locke's theory of personal identity to resist well-known accusations of circularity, failure of transitivity, and insufficiency for his theological and moral concerns. Although virtually every Locke scholar writes on at least some of these topics, the model of consciousness set forth here provides for an analysis of all of these issues as bound together by a common thread."--Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Weinberg, Shelley,
Dewey number
192
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Locke, John
  • Consciousness
Label
Consciousness in Locke, Shelley Weinberg
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-236) and index
Color
not applicable
Contents
  • Consciousness in the seventeenth century -- Consciousness in Locke's philosophical psychology -- Consciosness in Locke's theory of knowledge -- Consciousness in Locke's theory of personal identity -- Consciousness and moral motivation
  • Cover ; Consciousness in Locke; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1: Consciousness in the Seventeenth Century; 1.1 'Consciousness' and 'Conscience'; 1.2 Descartes; 1.3 Malebranche and Arnauld; 1.4 Cudworth; 1.5 Locke's Development (Parallels to Locke); 2: Consciousness in Locke's Philosophical Psychology; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Consciousness is Identical to Perception in General; 2.2.1 Consciousness is identical to reflection; 2.2.2 Consciousness is a source of ideas; 2.3 Consciousness is a Self-Referential Constituent of Ordinary Perception
  • 2.3.1 An objection and replies2.4 The Relation Consciousness Bears to Perception; 2.5 Consciousness in Memory, Sensitive Knowledge, Personal Identity, and the Cogito; 2.6 Conclusion; 3: Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Knowledge; PART I: Knowing our own Ideas (and Ourselves); 3.I.1 Lockean Representation; 3.I.2 Perceptions of Ideas Convey Knowledge; 3.I.3 Knowledge of an Idea as Propositional; 3.I.4 The Agreement in Knowing an Idea; 3.I.5. An Analogous Case: Knowing I Exist; 3.I.6 Problems of Perceptual Error; 3.I.7 A Textual Objection and Reply; 3.I.8 Conclusion
  • PART II: Knowing the Existence of Particular External Objects3. II. 1 Locke's Commitments-The Elements of Sensitive Knowledge; 3. II. 2 Sensitive Knowledge is the Perception of an Agreement of Ideas; 3. II. 3 From an Idea of an Object to the Real Existence of the Object; 3. II. 3.1 Why simple ideas of sensation conform to their causes; 3. II. 4 From Real Existence to Actual Real Existence; 3. II. 5 Locke's Reply to Stillingfleet; 3. II. 6 Conclusion; PART III: Sensitive Knowledge and the Skeptical Challenge; 3. III. 1 Locke's Epistemic Task
  • 3. III. 2 The Similarity of Intuitive and Sensitive Knowledge: The Nature of Intuitive Knowledge3. III. 3 The Similarity of Intuitive and Sensitive Knowledge: The Case for Sensitive Knowledge; 3. III. 4 The Difference in Degree of Certainty of Sensitive and Intuitive Knowledge; 3. III. 5 Conclusion; 4: Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Personal Identity; 4.1 The Metaphysical Fact of a Continuing Consciousness; 4.2 Consciousness and Memory-Two Questions; 4.3 Knowledge of the Metaphysical Fact of the Diachronic Self; 4.4 Conclusion; 5: Consciousness and Moral Motivation
  • 5.1 Motivation, Self-Preservation, and Happiness5.2 Motivation to Pursue Greater Goods; 5.3 Suspension of Desire and the Pursuit of a Greater Good; 5.4 Consciousness and the Concern for Happiness; 5.5 The Unity of Consciousness and MoralMotivation; 5.6 Animals are Conscious Too; 5.7 Conclusion; Conclusion; References; Index
Control code
ocn931873671
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 240 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191065842
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)931873671
Label
Consciousness in Locke, Shelley Weinberg
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-236) and index
Color
not applicable
Contents
  • Consciousness in the seventeenth century -- Consciousness in Locke's philosophical psychology -- Consciosness in Locke's theory of knowledge -- Consciousness in Locke's theory of personal identity -- Consciousness and moral motivation
  • Cover ; Consciousness in Locke; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1: Consciousness in the Seventeenth Century; 1.1 'Consciousness' and 'Conscience'; 1.2 Descartes; 1.3 Malebranche and Arnauld; 1.4 Cudworth; 1.5 Locke's Development (Parallels to Locke); 2: Consciousness in Locke's Philosophical Psychology; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Consciousness is Identical to Perception in General; 2.2.1 Consciousness is identical to reflection; 2.2.2 Consciousness is a source of ideas; 2.3 Consciousness is a Self-Referential Constituent of Ordinary Perception
  • 2.3.1 An objection and replies2.4 The Relation Consciousness Bears to Perception; 2.5 Consciousness in Memory, Sensitive Knowledge, Personal Identity, and the Cogito; 2.6 Conclusion; 3: Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Knowledge; PART I: Knowing our own Ideas (and Ourselves); 3.I.1 Lockean Representation; 3.I.2 Perceptions of Ideas Convey Knowledge; 3.I.3 Knowledge of an Idea as Propositional; 3.I.4 The Agreement in Knowing an Idea; 3.I.5. An Analogous Case: Knowing I Exist; 3.I.6 Problems of Perceptual Error; 3.I.7 A Textual Objection and Reply; 3.I.8 Conclusion
  • PART II: Knowing the Existence of Particular External Objects3. II. 1 Locke's Commitments-The Elements of Sensitive Knowledge; 3. II. 2 Sensitive Knowledge is the Perception of an Agreement of Ideas; 3. II. 3 From an Idea of an Object to the Real Existence of the Object; 3. II. 3.1 Why simple ideas of sensation conform to their causes; 3. II. 4 From Real Existence to Actual Real Existence; 3. II. 5 Locke's Reply to Stillingfleet; 3. II. 6 Conclusion; PART III: Sensitive Knowledge and the Skeptical Challenge; 3. III. 1 Locke's Epistemic Task
  • 3. III. 2 The Similarity of Intuitive and Sensitive Knowledge: The Nature of Intuitive Knowledge3. III. 3 The Similarity of Intuitive and Sensitive Knowledge: The Case for Sensitive Knowledge; 3. III. 4 The Difference in Degree of Certainty of Sensitive and Intuitive Knowledge; 3. III. 5 Conclusion; 4: Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Personal Identity; 4.1 The Metaphysical Fact of a Continuing Consciousness; 4.2 Consciousness and Memory-Two Questions; 4.3 Knowledge of the Metaphysical Fact of the Diachronic Self; 4.4 Conclusion; 5: Consciousness and Moral Motivation
  • 5.1 Motivation, Self-Preservation, and Happiness5.2 Motivation to Pursue Greater Goods; 5.3 Suspension of Desire and the Pursuit of a Greater Good; 5.4 Consciousness and the Concern for Happiness; 5.5 The Unity of Consciousness and MoralMotivation; 5.6 Animals are Conscious Too; 5.7 Conclusion; Conclusion; References; Index
Control code
ocn931873671
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 240 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191065842
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)931873671

Library Locations

    • InternetBorrow it
      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
Processing Feedback ...