Coverart for item
The Resource Conflict, security and development : an introduction, Paul Jackson and Danielle Beswick

Conflict, security and development : an introduction, Paul Jackson and Danielle Beswick

Label
Conflict, security and development : an introduction
Title
Conflict, security and development
Title remainder
an introduction
Statement of responsibility
Paul Jackson and Danielle Beswick
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1968 April 24-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jackson, Paul
Dewey number
355/.033
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Beswick, Danielle,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Security, International
  • Political violence
  • Economic development
Label
Conflict, security and development : an introduction, Paul Jackson and Danielle Beswick
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Praise for earlier editions; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of contents; List of Tables; List of Boxes; Preface to the third edition; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Development and security; Outline of the book; How the chapters are organised; 1 Are security and development mutually reinforcing?; Whose security are we talking about?; Fragile states; WDR 2011; Development and security: Inextricably entwined?; How has the relationship developed?; Is Africa different?; Continuity, history and globalisation; Fragile states and the New Deal
  • Aims of development and the liberal stateWhat is a liberal peace?; Does adding security to development just provide an armed wing of the liberal state?; The dangers of transferring models; Security and development after the MDGs; Summary points; Discussion questions; Further reading; 2 What does conflict look like in the developing world?; Are 'new wars' really new?; Mixed pictures and alternative funding; Targeting civilians is not new in wars; The logic of extreme violence; The importance of empirical evidence; So what does the new wars thesis tell us?; How do we measure wars?
  • Formal databases and measurementIssues with formal measurement and civilian casualties; Calculating battle deaths; How many wars?; Zones of conflict; The continuing importance of the state; Conflict actors; Warlords and insurgent leaders; Child soldiers and youth in violence; War economies; Ungoverned spaces and security threats; Summary points; Discussion questions; Note; Further reading; 3 How do people analyse conflict?; Greed and grievance; How does the model work?; Common criticisms; Resource wars and environmental explanations; Environmental conflict theory
  • 'New barbarism' and 'tribalism'Underemployment and identity; Ethnicity; Ethnicity and conflict in Rwanda; Structural and political violence; Samuel Huntington and structural violence; Summary points; Discussion questions; Further reading; 4 Refugees and internal displacement; Terminology: Differences between refugees and IDPs; What are the causes of refugee flows and displacement?; How many refugees and IDPs are there, and where are they?; How have states and other agencies dealt with refugees?; Refugees and the stateless; Institutionalising protection; The use of refugee and IDP camps
  • Urban refugeesSolutions to displacement; Displacement and security; Threats to security of displaced people; Denial of rights to work/move; Threats to the home state; Threats to the host state; Implications of displacement for development; Summary points; Discussion questions; Notes; Further reading; 5 Conflict and the role of development actors; Conflict stages and responses; What is development?; Is development becoming securitised?; Types of aid; Humanitarian aid; Development aid; Developments in humanitarian aid; Dunantist and Wilsonian humanitarian agencies
Control code
on1041108871
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Third edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781351264143
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Taylor & Francis
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1041108871
Label
Conflict, security and development : an introduction, Paul Jackson and Danielle Beswick
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Praise for earlier editions; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of contents; List of Tables; List of Boxes; Preface to the third edition; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Development and security; Outline of the book; How the chapters are organised; 1 Are security and development mutually reinforcing?; Whose security are we talking about?; Fragile states; WDR 2011; Development and security: Inextricably entwined?; How has the relationship developed?; Is Africa different?; Continuity, history and globalisation; Fragile states and the New Deal
  • Aims of development and the liberal stateWhat is a liberal peace?; Does adding security to development just provide an armed wing of the liberal state?; The dangers of transferring models; Security and development after the MDGs; Summary points; Discussion questions; Further reading; 2 What does conflict look like in the developing world?; Are 'new wars' really new?; Mixed pictures and alternative funding; Targeting civilians is not new in wars; The logic of extreme violence; The importance of empirical evidence; So what does the new wars thesis tell us?; How do we measure wars?
  • Formal databases and measurementIssues with formal measurement and civilian casualties; Calculating battle deaths; How many wars?; Zones of conflict; The continuing importance of the state; Conflict actors; Warlords and insurgent leaders; Child soldiers and youth in violence; War economies; Ungoverned spaces and security threats; Summary points; Discussion questions; Note; Further reading; 3 How do people analyse conflict?; Greed and grievance; How does the model work?; Common criticisms; Resource wars and environmental explanations; Environmental conflict theory
  • 'New barbarism' and 'tribalism'Underemployment and identity; Ethnicity; Ethnicity and conflict in Rwanda; Structural and political violence; Samuel Huntington and structural violence; Summary points; Discussion questions; Further reading; 4 Refugees and internal displacement; Terminology: Differences between refugees and IDPs; What are the causes of refugee flows and displacement?; How many refugees and IDPs are there, and where are they?; How have states and other agencies dealt with refugees?; Refugees and the stateless; Institutionalising protection; The use of refugee and IDP camps
  • Urban refugeesSolutions to displacement; Displacement and security; Threats to security of displaced people; Denial of rights to work/move; Threats to the home state; Threats to the host state; Implications of displacement for development; Summary points; Discussion questions; Notes; Further reading; 5 Conflict and the role of development actors; Conflict stages and responses; What is development?; Is development becoming securitised?; Types of aid; Humanitarian aid; Development aid; Developments in humanitarian aid; Dunantist and Wilsonian humanitarian agencies
Control code
on1041108871
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Third edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781351264143
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Taylor & Francis
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1041108871

Library Locations

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