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The Resource Bidirectional optimality theory, edited by Anton Benz, Jason Mattausch, (electronic resource)

Bidirectional optimality theory, edited by Anton Benz, Jason Mattausch, (electronic resource)

Label
Bidirectional optimality theory
Title
Bidirectional optimality theory
Statement of responsibility
edited by Anton Benz, Jason Mattausch
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Bidirectional Optimality Theory (BiOT) emerged at the turn of the millennium as a fusion of Radical Pragmatics and Optimality Theoretic Semantics. It stirred a wealth of new research in the pragmatics-semantics interface and heavily influenced e.g. the development of evolutionary and game theoretic approaches. Optimality Theory holds that linguistic output can be understood as the optimized products of ranked constraints. At the centre of BiOT is the insight that this optimisation has to take place both in production and interpretation, and that the production-interpretation cycle has to lead
Member of
Dewey number
401/.4
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • charts
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1965-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Benz, Anton
  • Mattausch, Jason
Series statement
Linguistik aktuell = Linguistics today,
Series volume
v. 180
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Optimality theory (Linguistics)
  • Linguistic change
  • Pragmatics
  • Semantics
Label
Bidirectional optimality theory, edited by Anton Benz, Jason Mattausch, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Bidirectional Optimality Theory; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Table of contents; Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 1. Optimality Theory; 2. Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 3. Stochastic Optimality Theory; 4. Games and Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 5. Overview; References; A programme for bidirectional phonology and phonetics and their acquisition and evolution; 1. Phonological representations: Underlying and Surface Form; 1.1 The relation between underlying form and surface form; 1.2 The process of merely-phonological production
  • 1.3 The process of merely-phonological comprehension1.4 Merely-phonological acquisition; 1.5 Merely-phonological evolution; 1.6 What is wrong with merely-phonological grammars?; 2. Phonetic representations: Auditory and Articulatory Form; 2.1 The relation between Auditory Form and Articulatory form; 2.2 The process of merely-phonetic articulation; 2.3 The processes of merely-phonetic audition; 2.4 Merely-phonetic acquisition; 2.5 Merely-phonetic evolution; 3. The phonology-phonetics interface; 3.1 The relation between Surface Form and Auditory Form; 3.2 The process of prelexical perception
  • 3.3 Unidirectional acquisition of prelexical perception3.4 The process of prototype selection; 3.5 Acquisition of prototype selection?; 3.6 The evolution of the phonology-phonetics interface; 3.7 Is this how the phonology-phonetics interface works?; 4. The three 'low' representations: Articulatory Form -- Auditory Form -- Surface Form; 4.1 The process of phonetic production; 4.2 The acquisition of phonetic knowledge; 4.3 The evolution of phonetic implementation; 4.4 Is this how the phonetic representations are connected to the phonology?
  • 5. The three 'middle' representations: Auditory Form -- Surface Form -- Underlying Form5.1 The serial edition of the process of phonetic-phonological comprehension; 5.2 The parallel edition of the process of phonetic-phonological comprehension; 6. The quadruplet Underlying -- Surface -- Auditory -- Articulatory; 6.1 The process of phonological-phonetic production; 6.2 The acquisition of phonological-phonetic production; 7. Semantic representations; 8. The phonology-semantics interface: The lexicon; 8.1 Relations; 8.2 The process of lexical retrieval in production
  • 8.3 The process of the access of meaning in comprehension8.4 The acquisition of lexical relations; 9. The triplet Morphemes -- Underlying Form -- Surface Form; 9.1 The influence of Morphemes (and Context) on word recognition; 9.2 Acquisition; 10. Discussion; 10.1 The larger picture: Whole-language simulations; 10.2 The assumptions: Naïve bidirectionality and multi-level parallelism; References; A note on the emergence of subject salience; 1. Introduction: Salience and subjecthood; 2. Centering Theory's Rule 1; 3. Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 4. Beaver's COT; 5. Evolving subject salience
Control code
ocn774287650
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (279 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027284525
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)774287650
Label
Bidirectional optimality theory, edited by Anton Benz, Jason Mattausch, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Bidirectional Optimality Theory; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Table of contents; Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 1. Optimality Theory; 2. Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 3. Stochastic Optimality Theory; 4. Games and Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 5. Overview; References; A programme for bidirectional phonology and phonetics and their acquisition and evolution; 1. Phonological representations: Underlying and Surface Form; 1.1 The relation between underlying form and surface form; 1.2 The process of merely-phonological production
  • 1.3 The process of merely-phonological comprehension1.4 Merely-phonological acquisition; 1.5 Merely-phonological evolution; 1.6 What is wrong with merely-phonological grammars?; 2. Phonetic representations: Auditory and Articulatory Form; 2.1 The relation between Auditory Form and Articulatory form; 2.2 The process of merely-phonetic articulation; 2.3 The processes of merely-phonetic audition; 2.4 Merely-phonetic acquisition; 2.5 Merely-phonetic evolution; 3. The phonology-phonetics interface; 3.1 The relation between Surface Form and Auditory Form; 3.2 The process of prelexical perception
  • 3.3 Unidirectional acquisition of prelexical perception3.4 The process of prototype selection; 3.5 Acquisition of prototype selection?; 3.6 The evolution of the phonology-phonetics interface; 3.7 Is this how the phonology-phonetics interface works?; 4. The three 'low' representations: Articulatory Form -- Auditory Form -- Surface Form; 4.1 The process of phonetic production; 4.2 The acquisition of phonetic knowledge; 4.3 The evolution of phonetic implementation; 4.4 Is this how the phonetic representations are connected to the phonology?
  • 5. The three 'middle' representations: Auditory Form -- Surface Form -- Underlying Form5.1 The serial edition of the process of phonetic-phonological comprehension; 5.2 The parallel edition of the process of phonetic-phonological comprehension; 6. The quadruplet Underlying -- Surface -- Auditory -- Articulatory; 6.1 The process of phonological-phonetic production; 6.2 The acquisition of phonological-phonetic production; 7. Semantic representations; 8. The phonology-semantics interface: The lexicon; 8.1 Relations; 8.2 The process of lexical retrieval in production
  • 8.3 The process of the access of meaning in comprehension8.4 The acquisition of lexical relations; 9. The triplet Morphemes -- Underlying Form -- Surface Form; 9.1 The influence of Morphemes (and Context) on word recognition; 9.2 Acquisition; 10. Discussion; 10.1 The larger picture: Whole-language simulations; 10.2 The assumptions: Naïve bidirectionality and multi-level parallelism; References; A note on the emergence of subject salience; 1. Introduction: Salience and subjecthood; 2. Centering Theory's Rule 1; 3. Bidirectional Optimality Theory; 4. Beaver's COT; 5. Evolving subject salience
Control code
ocn774287650
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (279 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027284525
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)774287650

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