Coverart for item
The Resource Archaeology and the senses : human experience, memory, and affect, Yannis Hamilakis

Archaeology and the senses : human experience, memory, and affect, Yannis Hamilakis

Label
Archaeology and the senses : human experience, memory, and affect
Title
Archaeology and the senses
Title remainder
human experience, memory, and affect
Statement of responsibility
Yannis Hamilakis
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"This book is an exciting new look at how archaeology has dealt with the bodily senses and offers an argument for how the discipline can offer a richer glimpse into the human sensory experience. Yannis Hamilakis shows how, despite its intensely physical engagement with the material traces of the past, archaeology has mostly neglected multi-sensory experience, instead prioritizing isolated vision and relying on the Western hierarchy of the five senses. In place of this limited view of experience, Hamilakis proposes a sensorial archaeology that can unearth the lost, suppressed, and forgotten sensory and affective modalities of humans. Using Bronze Age Crete as a case study, Hamilakis shows how sensorial memory can help us rethink questions ranging from the production of ancestral heritage to large-scale social change, and the cultural significance of monuments. Tracing the emergence of palaces in Bronze Age Crete as a celebration of the long-term, sensuous history and memory of their localities, Hamilakis points the way to reconstituting archaeology as a sensorial and affective multi-temporal practice. At the same time, he proposes a new framework on the interaction between bodily senses, things, and environments, which will be relevant to scholars in other fields"--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hamilakis, Yannis
Dewey number
930.1028
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Archaeology
  • Senses and sensation
  • Crete (Greece)
  • Material culture
Label
Archaeology and the senses : human experience, memory, and affect, Yannis Hamilakis
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Archaeology and the senses; Title page; Copyright page; Dedication; Contents; Figures; Preface; 1 Demolishing the museum of sensory ab/sense; 2 Western modernity, archaeology, and the senses; Cesspools and bourgeois experience; Class, race, and the construction of modernist sensorial regimes; The senses in early philosophical thought and social theory: A brief excursus; Sensorial clashes: Archaeology and the sensorial regimes of modernity; Archaeology as an 'exhibitionary' discipline; The photographic and the archaeological
  • Sacred antiquities: The dialectic between sensorial intimacy and distanceThe silence of the museum; Archaeological paradigms and sensoriality; A ghost is haunting archaeology. . .; 3 Recapturing sensorial and affective experience; A new era for sensoriality?; New multi-sensorial arenas, new sensorial fields? The cinema and the museum; Philosophies of sensoriality; How many senses are there?; Corporeal visuality?; Food/senses/memories; Sensoriality as bio-politics; Eating and sensoriality: a gustemology or a new ontology?; Archaeologies of the senses
  • Landscape phenomenology as archaeology of the senses?Spatial technologies, virtual realities, archaeologies of the senses?; Conclusions; 4 Senses, materiality, time: A New Ontology; The senses are about the nature and status of being; The senses are infinite; Archaeology can explore that sensorial infinity; From the body and the thing, to the field and the flow; Sensorial flows are risky and unpredictable; The senses are political; The senses are historical; Every sensorial perception is full of memories; Sensorial reflexivity should be the starting point of any sensorial analysis
  • The senses are multi-temporal -- they activate the multi-temporality of matter: a Bergsonian ontologyArchaeologies of the senses are also archaeologies of affect; Sensorial assemblages; From ontology to ontogeny; 5 Sensorial necro-politics: The Mortuary Mnemoscapes of Bronze Age Crete; The Smell of Death; Diverse sensorialities in the burial arena; The emergence of the 'individual'?; Individuals and personhood in archaeology; From individuals to trans-corporeality; The dialectic between sensorial remembering and forgetting; The mortuary landscape as a chronotopic map; Sensorial necro-politics
  • 6 Why 'palaces'?Crete of a hundred palaces? Court-centred buildings as arenas of sensoriality; Palaces as celebrations of sensorial and mnemonic history; (1) Sense of Place; (2) Sense of Embodied Commensality; (3) Sense of Ancestral Lineage and Continuity; Regimenting and regulating sensorial experience: the production of a mnemonic record; Smashing pots; Performative audio-vision: experiencing wall paintings; Archaeology as sensorial and mnemonic history: conclusion; 7 From corporeality to sensoriality, from things to flows; Notes; 1 Demolishing the museum of sensory ab/sense
Control code
ocn868068310
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781107731745
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)868068310
Label
Archaeology and the senses : human experience, memory, and affect, Yannis Hamilakis
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Archaeology and the senses; Title page; Copyright page; Dedication; Contents; Figures; Preface; 1 Demolishing the museum of sensory ab/sense; 2 Western modernity, archaeology, and the senses; Cesspools and bourgeois experience; Class, race, and the construction of modernist sensorial regimes; The senses in early philosophical thought and social theory: A brief excursus; Sensorial clashes: Archaeology and the sensorial regimes of modernity; Archaeology as an 'exhibitionary' discipline; The photographic and the archaeological
  • Sacred antiquities: The dialectic between sensorial intimacy and distanceThe silence of the museum; Archaeological paradigms and sensoriality; A ghost is haunting archaeology. . .; 3 Recapturing sensorial and affective experience; A new era for sensoriality?; New multi-sensorial arenas, new sensorial fields? The cinema and the museum; Philosophies of sensoriality; How many senses are there?; Corporeal visuality?; Food/senses/memories; Sensoriality as bio-politics; Eating and sensoriality: a gustemology or a new ontology?; Archaeologies of the senses
  • Landscape phenomenology as archaeology of the senses?Spatial technologies, virtual realities, archaeologies of the senses?; Conclusions; 4 Senses, materiality, time: A New Ontology; The senses are about the nature and status of being; The senses are infinite; Archaeology can explore that sensorial infinity; From the body and the thing, to the field and the flow; Sensorial flows are risky and unpredictable; The senses are political; The senses are historical; Every sensorial perception is full of memories; Sensorial reflexivity should be the starting point of any sensorial analysis
  • The senses are multi-temporal -- they activate the multi-temporality of matter: a Bergsonian ontologyArchaeologies of the senses are also archaeologies of affect; Sensorial assemblages; From ontology to ontogeny; 5 Sensorial necro-politics: The Mortuary Mnemoscapes of Bronze Age Crete; The Smell of Death; Diverse sensorialities in the burial arena; The emergence of the 'individual'?; Individuals and personhood in archaeology; From individuals to trans-corporeality; The dialectic between sensorial remembering and forgetting; The mortuary landscape as a chronotopic map; Sensorial necro-politics
  • 6 Why 'palaces'?Crete of a hundred palaces? Court-centred buildings as arenas of sensoriality; Palaces as celebrations of sensorial and mnemonic history; (1) Sense of Place; (2) Sense of Embodied Commensality; (3) Sense of Ancestral Lineage and Continuity; Regimenting and regulating sensorial experience: the production of a mnemonic record; Smashing pots; Performative audio-vision: experiencing wall paintings; Archaeology as sensorial and mnemonic history: conclusion; 7 From corporeality to sensoriality, from things to flows; Notes; 1 Demolishing the museum of sensory ab/sense
Control code
ocn868068310
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781107731745
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)868068310

Library Locations

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