Coverart for item
The Resource Anthrozoology : human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals, edited by Geoff Hosey & Vicky Melfi

Anthrozoology : human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals, edited by Geoff Hosey & Vicky Melfi

Label
Anthrozoology : human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals
Title
Anthrozoology
Title remainder
human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals
Statement of responsibility
edited by Geoff Hosey & Vicky Melfi
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Anthrozoology, the study of human-animal interactions (HAIs), has experienced substantial growth during the past 20 years and it is now timely to synthesise what we know from empirical evidence about our relationships with both domesticated and wild animals. Two principal points of focus have become apparent in much of this research. One is the realisation that the strength of these attachments not only has emotional benefits for people, but confers health benefits as well, such that a whole area has opened up of using companion animals for therapeutic purposes. The other is the recognition that the interactions we have with animals have consequences for their welfare too, and thus impact on their quality of life. Consequently we now study HAIs in all scenarios in which animals come into contact with humans, whether as pets/companions, farm livestock, laboratory animals, animals in zoos, or in the wild. This topical area of study is of growing importance for animals in animal management, animal handling, animal welfare and applied ethology courses, and also for people within psychology, anthropology and human geography at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level. It will therefore be of interest to students, researchers, and animal managers across the whole spectrum of human-animal contact
Dewey number
591.5
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Hosey, Geoffrey R.,
  • Melfi, Vicky,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Human-animal relationships
  • Animals
Label
Anthrozoology : human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals, edited by Geoff Hosey & Vicky Melfi
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Anthrozoology: Human-Animal Interactions in Domesticated and Wild Animals; Copyright; Preface; Contents; Contributors; CHAPTER 1. Introduction; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Defining what we mean; 1.2.1 HAS, HAI, HAR and HAB; 1.2.2 Relationship quality; 1.3 What is the distribution of HARs through the animal kingdom?; 1.3.1 Distribution of HARs among animals; 1.3.2 Relationships between (nonhuman) animals; 1.4 Why do we care about HAI, HAR and HAB?; 1.4.1 Financial incentives; 1.4.2 Improved quality of life; 1.4.3 To ensure scientific rigour; 1.4.4 To minimise human-animal conflict
  • 1.4.5 To create a better worldReferences; CHAPTER 2. Companion animals; 2.1 What is a companion animal?; 2.2 A brief history of companion animals; 2.3 Companion animals today; 2.4 The benefits of companion animal ownership; 2.5 Indirect benefits of companion animals; 2.6 The costs of companion animal ownership; 2.7 Conclusions and future areas of research; References; CHAPTER 3. Agricultural animals; 3.1 Historical and present role of agricultural animals for humans; Box 3.1 Animals, humans and the environment; 3.2 Human-animal interactions and human-animal relationships in agriculture
  • 3.2.1 Individualised and generalised relationships in agriculture3.2.2 Situations, type and quality of interactions; 3.2.3 Differences in interactions between production systems; 3.2.4 Variation of interactions within production systems; 3.2.5 Why do human-animal interactions differ? The role of attitudes and herd size; 3.3 Effects of the HAR on animal and human welfare and on productivity; 3.3.1 The human factor-HAR and animal welfare; 3.3.2 Direct effects of the human-animal relationship-HAI and animal welfare and productivity; 3.3.2.1 Effects of HAI on physiology-stress and anti-stress
  • 3.3.2.2 HAI effects on productivity3.3.2.3 HAI effects on immune function and health; 3.3.2.4 Further effects of HAI; 3.3.3 Indirect effects: the human's relationship with animals and animal welfare; 3.3.4 HAI and human health and well-being; 3.4 Wider ranging implications for society and environment; 3.5 Future areas for research; 3.5.1 Effects of mechanisation and increasing herd size; 3.5.2 Sensitive periods; 3.5.3 Quantity and quality of interactions; 3.5.4 Social learning and the social environment; 3.5.5 Selection for tameness and docility; 3.6 Concluding remarks; References
  • CHAPTER 4. Human-animal interactions in the research environment4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Animals in research facilities; 4.2.1 Number of animals in research facilities; 4.2.2 Reason for captivity; 4.2.3 Types of human-animal interactions; 4.3 Implications of human-animal interactions; 4.3.1 Assessing human-animal interactions; 4.3.2 The effect of human-animal interaction on the animals; 4.3.3 Effect of human-animal interactions on staff; 4.3.4 Costs and benefits of human-animal interactions; 4.4 Wider implications of human-animal interactions; 4.5 Future areas for research; Acknowledgements
Control code
on1078636511
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191068065
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1078636511
Label
Anthrozoology : human-animal interactions in domesticated and wild animals, edited by Geoff Hosey & Vicky Melfi
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Anthrozoology: Human-Animal Interactions in Domesticated and Wild Animals; Copyright; Preface; Contents; Contributors; CHAPTER 1. Introduction; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Defining what we mean; 1.2.1 HAS, HAI, HAR and HAB; 1.2.2 Relationship quality; 1.3 What is the distribution of HARs through the animal kingdom?; 1.3.1 Distribution of HARs among animals; 1.3.2 Relationships between (nonhuman) animals; 1.4 Why do we care about HAI, HAR and HAB?; 1.4.1 Financial incentives; 1.4.2 Improved quality of life; 1.4.3 To ensure scientific rigour; 1.4.4 To minimise human-animal conflict
  • 1.4.5 To create a better worldReferences; CHAPTER 2. Companion animals; 2.1 What is a companion animal?; 2.2 A brief history of companion animals; 2.3 Companion animals today; 2.4 The benefits of companion animal ownership; 2.5 Indirect benefits of companion animals; 2.6 The costs of companion animal ownership; 2.7 Conclusions and future areas of research; References; CHAPTER 3. Agricultural animals; 3.1 Historical and present role of agricultural animals for humans; Box 3.1 Animals, humans and the environment; 3.2 Human-animal interactions and human-animal relationships in agriculture
  • 3.2.1 Individualised and generalised relationships in agriculture3.2.2 Situations, type and quality of interactions; 3.2.3 Differences in interactions between production systems; 3.2.4 Variation of interactions within production systems; 3.2.5 Why do human-animal interactions differ? The role of attitudes and herd size; 3.3 Effects of the HAR on animal and human welfare and on productivity; 3.3.1 The human factor-HAR and animal welfare; 3.3.2 Direct effects of the human-animal relationship-HAI and animal welfare and productivity; 3.3.2.1 Effects of HAI on physiology-stress and anti-stress
  • 3.3.2.2 HAI effects on productivity3.3.2.3 HAI effects on immune function and health; 3.3.2.4 Further effects of HAI; 3.3.3 Indirect effects: the human's relationship with animals and animal welfare; 3.3.4 HAI and human health and well-being; 3.4 Wider ranging implications for society and environment; 3.5 Future areas for research; 3.5.1 Effects of mechanisation and increasing herd size; 3.5.2 Sensitive periods; 3.5.3 Quantity and quality of interactions; 3.5.4 Social learning and the social environment; 3.5.5 Selection for tameness and docility; 3.6 Concluding remarks; References
  • CHAPTER 4. Human-animal interactions in the research environment4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Animals in research facilities; 4.2.1 Number of animals in research facilities; 4.2.2 Reason for captivity; 4.2.3 Types of human-animal interactions; 4.3 Implications of human-animal interactions; 4.3.1 Assessing human-animal interactions; 4.3.2 The effect of human-animal interaction on the animals; 4.3.3 Effect of human-animal interactions on staff; 4.3.4 Costs and benefits of human-animal interactions; 4.4 Wider implications of human-animal interactions; 4.5 Future areas for research; Acknowledgements
Control code
on1078636511
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
First edition
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191068065
Level of compression
unknown
Note
Oxford University Press
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1078636511

Library Locations

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      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
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