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The Resource An outline of international price theories, Chi-Yuen Wu

An outline of international price theories, Chi-Yuen Wu

Label
An outline of international price theories
Title
An outline of international price theories
Statement of responsibility
Chi-Yuen Wu
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Covering the period 1550 - 1939, this book examines the history and development of theories of international pricing and trade. The work of the following economists is covered: Locke, Barbon, Vaderlint, Harris, Hume, Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, Bosanquet, Mill, Torrens, Marshall, Haberler, Austin, Stirling, Chevalier, Carines, Jevons, Leslie, Goschen, Bagehot, Wicksell, Sidgwick, Pigou, Viner, Heckscher, Ohlin, Keynes, Taussig, and Pareto. The volume includes an extensive Bibliography of each period discussed as well as comprehensive indices of subjects and names
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1912-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Wu, Qiyuan
Dewey number
338.52
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Routledge library editions. Economics
Series volume
11
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Foreign exchange
  • Prices
  • Commercial policy
Label
An outline of international price theories, Chi-Yuen Wu
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Originally published: London : G. Routledge, 1939
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 323-355) and indexes
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; ACKNOWLEDGMENT; PREFACE; CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION; 1. Introductory remarks; 2. The four major problems in the theory of international price relationships: the Problems; 3. A bird's-eye view of the historical development of the theory; 4. The plan of the following chapters; CHAPTER II THE MERCANTILISTIC THEORIES; 1. Mercantilism: four stages of its development. The first period: before 1550
  • 2. The second period: 1550 to 1620. The controversy concerning the price revolution (Hales, Malestroit, Bodin)3. The foreign exchange controversy; 4. Gerrald de Malynes; 5. The third period: 1620 to 1680. The balance of trade controversy (Mun and others); 6. Vaughan, Petty and Potter; 7. The fourth period: 1680 to about 1750. The first protectionist controversy (Cary, Pollexfen, Child, Davenant). North, a free trader; 8. John Locke and N. Barbon; 9. The doctrine that money stimulates trade and production: Law, Melon and Forbonnais
  • 10. ""The semi-equilibrium doctrine"": Vanderlint, Cantillon and Harris11. Summary; CHAPTER III FROM DAVID HUME TO JOHN STUART MILL: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLASSICAL THEORIES; 1. David Hume; 2. The Physiocrats and Adam Smith; 3. The Bank Restriction Controversy: 1797 to 1803: Boyd, Thornton and others; 4. 1803 to 1808: Foster and the Report of the Committee on Irish Currency and Exchanges; 5. Wheatley and Blake; 6. The report of the Bullion Committee. Ricardo, Malthus and Bosanquet. Contributions of the participants in the Bank Restriction Controversy; 7. Nassau Senior
  • 8. The Bank Charter Act Controversy: the currency school (Norman, Loyd and Torrens) the banking school (Tooke and Fullarton).; 9. The restatement by J.S. Mill; 10. Summary; CHAPTER IV THE CLASSICAL THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE; 1. The argument for a separate theory for international trade; 2. The doctrine of comparative costs: Torrens and Ricardo; 3. The same subject continued: Marshall and Haberler; 4. The doctrine of reciprocal demands: Longfield, Torrens, Pennington and J.S. Mill
  • 5. Marshall's restatement of the theory of international value as an improvement upon the classical theory of international value6. Cost of transport as a factor in international trade; 7. The classical theory of international trade as the foundation of the classical theory of international price relationships.; CHAPTER V POST-CLASSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE MONETARY ASPECTS OF THE THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL PRICE RELATIONSHIPS: 1848-1918; 1. The controversy concerning the gold discoveries of 1848-1851: Austin, Stirling, Chevalier and Newmarch
Control code
ocn860711669
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (373 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781136515903
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)860711669
Label
An outline of international price theories, Chi-Yuen Wu
Publication
Note
Originally published: London : G. Routledge, 1939
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 323-355) and indexes
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; ACKNOWLEDGMENT; PREFACE; CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION; 1. Introductory remarks; 2. The four major problems in the theory of international price relationships: the Problems; 3. A bird's-eye view of the historical development of the theory; 4. The plan of the following chapters; CHAPTER II THE MERCANTILISTIC THEORIES; 1. Mercantilism: four stages of its development. The first period: before 1550
  • 2. The second period: 1550 to 1620. The controversy concerning the price revolution (Hales, Malestroit, Bodin)3. The foreign exchange controversy; 4. Gerrald de Malynes; 5. The third period: 1620 to 1680. The balance of trade controversy (Mun and others); 6. Vaughan, Petty and Potter; 7. The fourth period: 1680 to about 1750. The first protectionist controversy (Cary, Pollexfen, Child, Davenant). North, a free trader; 8. John Locke and N. Barbon; 9. The doctrine that money stimulates trade and production: Law, Melon and Forbonnais
  • 10. ""The semi-equilibrium doctrine"": Vanderlint, Cantillon and Harris11. Summary; CHAPTER III FROM DAVID HUME TO JOHN STUART MILL: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLASSICAL THEORIES; 1. David Hume; 2. The Physiocrats and Adam Smith; 3. The Bank Restriction Controversy: 1797 to 1803: Boyd, Thornton and others; 4. 1803 to 1808: Foster and the Report of the Committee on Irish Currency and Exchanges; 5. Wheatley and Blake; 6. The report of the Bullion Committee. Ricardo, Malthus and Bosanquet. Contributions of the participants in the Bank Restriction Controversy; 7. Nassau Senior
  • 8. The Bank Charter Act Controversy: the currency school (Norman, Loyd and Torrens) the banking school (Tooke and Fullarton).; 9. The restatement by J.S. Mill; 10. Summary; CHAPTER IV THE CLASSICAL THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE; 1. The argument for a separate theory for international trade; 2. The doctrine of comparative costs: Torrens and Ricardo; 3. The same subject continued: Marshall and Haberler; 4. The doctrine of reciprocal demands: Longfield, Torrens, Pennington and J.S. Mill
  • 5. Marshall's restatement of the theory of international value as an improvement upon the classical theory of international value6. Cost of transport as a factor in international trade; 7. The classical theory of international trade as the foundation of the classical theory of international price relationships.; CHAPTER V POST-CLASSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE MONETARY ASPECTS OF THE THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL PRICE RELATIONSHIPS: 1848-1918; 1. The controversy concerning the gold discoveries of 1848-1851: Austin, Stirling, Chevalier and Newmarch
Control code
ocn860711669
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (373 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781136515903
Level of compression
unknown
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)860711669

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