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The Resource An introduction to the philosophy of art, Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania

An introduction to the philosophy of art, Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania

Label
An introduction to the philosophy of art
Title
An introduction to the philosophy of art
Statement of responsibility
Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1953-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Eldridge, Richard Thomas
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Cambridge introductions to philosophy
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Arts
  • Aesthetics
Label
An introduction to the philosophy of art, Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Representation and aboutness
  • Aristotle on imitation
  • Visual depiction, resemblance, and game-playing
  • Contemporary theories of depiction
  • Representing as natural, human, world-responsive activity
  • Distinctive functions of artistic representation
  • Beauty, absorption, and pleasure
  • Kant on natural and artistic beauty
  • General versus individual form
  • Beardsley's theory of individual form
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Criticisms of formalist-aesthetic theories of art
  • Defenses of the aesthetic interest of art
  • Feelings about subject matters in life: Wordsworth, Tolstoy, and Collingwood
  • What is expressed in art? Hegel versus Danto
  • How is artistic expression achieved?
  • Collingwood's psychodynamic theory
  • Physiognomic similarity theories
  • "Working-through" theories
  • Emotions and contemporary psychology
  • Why does artistic expression matter?
  • Who needs a theory of art?
  • Genius and the pursuit of the new: Kant
  • Hegel's criticisms of subjectivism
  • Why originality matters: Adorn on free meaning-making
  • Criticisms of the pursuit of originality: postmodernism and feminism
  • Originality and imagination within common life
  • Creativity: Scruton and Coleridge on artistic imagination
  • Six strategies for understanding art
  • The natures of thought and action: Hegel, Baxandall, and others
  • Pluralism and constraint in interpretation: Abrams, Fish, and Derrida
  • The special importance of the elucidation of formal-semantic elements
  • Philosophy as articulation
  • Nehamas and Felski on what calls for elucidatory interpretation
  • The possibility of agreement in understanding
  • Why we go on arguing about which works are good
  • Subjectivism and the sociology of taste: Smith and Bourdieu
  • Dickie's institutional theory
  • Historical and narrative identifications: Levinson and Carroll
  • Objectivism: Mothersill and Savile
  • Hume on feeling and judgment
  • Kant on feeling and judgment
  • Personal andlversus discussable: Isenberg, Scruton, and Cohen on taste
  • Art as a natural social practice
  • Some varieties of emotional response
  • The paradox of fiction
  • Hume on tragedy: denying (1)
  • Making-believe and quasi-emotions: Walton, Levinson, and Feagin
  • Robinson on affective appraisals: denying (3)
  • Danto and Cohen on powers of attentive involvement
  • Aristotle on catharsis
  • Artistic making and the "working through" of emotion
  • Some controversial cases: Mapplethorpe, Serrano, Finley, and others
  • Autonomism and experimentalism
  • Action, gesture, and expressive freedom
  • Moralism and the clarification of thought and feeling
  • Clarificationism and responding to complexity
  • Art, propaganda, advertising, and clich⥠--
  • Ethical understanding and working through puzzlement
  • The reproduction of social life vis-a-vis "infinite satisfaction"
  • Art and modernity: Schiller and others
  • Lukacs, Marcuse, and Adorno
  • Structuralism and structural opposition in social life: Levi Strauss and Althusser
  • Foster's postmodern sociocultural criticism
  • Avant-gardism and contemporary art
  • Schiller on art, life, and modernity
  • Can artistic beauty still matter? What about fun?
  • Art and social aspiration
  • Some contemporary practices of art: primitivism, vernacularism, avant-gardism, and constructivism
  • Identification versus elucidation
  • What may we hope for from the philosophy of art?
Control code
ocn865179770
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
Second edition
Extent
xii, 312 pages
Isbn
9781107041691
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013036864
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)865179770
Label
An introduction to the philosophy of art, Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Representation and aboutness
  • Aristotle on imitation
  • Visual depiction, resemblance, and game-playing
  • Contemporary theories of depiction
  • Representing as natural, human, world-responsive activity
  • Distinctive functions of artistic representation
  • Beauty, absorption, and pleasure
  • Kant on natural and artistic beauty
  • General versus individual form
  • Beardsley's theory of individual form
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Criticisms of formalist-aesthetic theories of art
  • Defenses of the aesthetic interest of art
  • Feelings about subject matters in life: Wordsworth, Tolstoy, and Collingwood
  • What is expressed in art? Hegel versus Danto
  • How is artistic expression achieved?
  • Collingwood's psychodynamic theory
  • Physiognomic similarity theories
  • "Working-through" theories
  • Emotions and contemporary psychology
  • Why does artistic expression matter?
  • Who needs a theory of art?
  • Genius and the pursuit of the new: Kant
  • Hegel's criticisms of subjectivism
  • Why originality matters: Adorn on free meaning-making
  • Criticisms of the pursuit of originality: postmodernism and feminism
  • Originality and imagination within common life
  • Creativity: Scruton and Coleridge on artistic imagination
  • Six strategies for understanding art
  • The natures of thought and action: Hegel, Baxandall, and others
  • Pluralism and constraint in interpretation: Abrams, Fish, and Derrida
  • The special importance of the elucidation of formal-semantic elements
  • Philosophy as articulation
  • Nehamas and Felski on what calls for elucidatory interpretation
  • The possibility of agreement in understanding
  • Why we go on arguing about which works are good
  • Subjectivism and the sociology of taste: Smith and Bourdieu
  • Dickie's institutional theory
  • Historical and narrative identifications: Levinson and Carroll
  • Objectivism: Mothersill and Savile
  • Hume on feeling and judgment
  • Kant on feeling and judgment
  • Personal andlversus discussable: Isenberg, Scruton, and Cohen on taste
  • Art as a natural social practice
  • Some varieties of emotional response
  • The paradox of fiction
  • Hume on tragedy: denying (1)
  • Making-believe and quasi-emotions: Walton, Levinson, and Feagin
  • Robinson on affective appraisals: denying (3)
  • Danto and Cohen on powers of attentive involvement
  • Aristotle on catharsis
  • Artistic making and the "working through" of emotion
  • Some controversial cases: Mapplethorpe, Serrano, Finley, and others
  • Autonomism and experimentalism
  • Action, gesture, and expressive freedom
  • Moralism and the clarification of thought and feeling
  • Clarificationism and responding to complexity
  • Art, propaganda, advertising, and clich⥠--
  • Ethical understanding and working through puzzlement
  • The reproduction of social life vis-a-vis "infinite satisfaction"
  • Art and modernity: Schiller and others
  • Lukacs, Marcuse, and Adorno
  • Structuralism and structural opposition in social life: Levi Strauss and Althusser
  • Foster's postmodern sociocultural criticism
  • Avant-gardism and contemporary art
  • Schiller on art, life, and modernity
  • Can artistic beauty still matter? What about fun?
  • Art and social aspiration
  • Some contemporary practices of art: primitivism, vernacularism, avant-gardism, and constructivism
  • Identification versus elucidation
  • What may we hope for from the philosophy of art?
Control code
ocn865179770
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
Second edition
Extent
xii, 312 pages
Isbn
9781107041691
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013036864
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)865179770

Library Locations

    • Manawatū LibraryBorrow it
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      -40.385340 175.617349
    • Wellington LibraryBorrow it
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      -40.385395 175.617407
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