Coverart for item
The Resource An introduction to primate conservation, edited by Serge A. Wich, Andrew J. Marshall

An introduction to primate conservation, edited by Serge A. Wich, Andrew J. Marshall

Label
An introduction to primate conservation
Title
An introduction to primate conservation
Statement of responsibility
edited by Serge A. Wich, Andrew J. Marshall
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book provides a comprehensive and state-of-the-art synthesis of research principles and applied management practices for primate conservation
Dewey number
639.97/98
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Wich, Serge A.,
  • Marshall, A. J.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Primates
  • Wildlife conservation
Label
An introduction to primate conservation, edited by Serge A. Wich, Andrew J. Marshall
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • List of contributors; 1. An introduction to primate conservation; Serge A. Wich and Andrew J. Marshall; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The primate order; 1.3 Threats to primates; 1.3.1 Habitat loss; 1.3.2 Habitat degradation; 1.3.3 Habitat fragmentation; 1.3.4 Drivers of habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation; 1.3.5 Hunting; 1.3.6 Disease; 1.3.7 Climate change; 1.3.8 Roads; 1.4 Approaches to primate conservation; 1.4.1 Protected areas; 1.4.2 Law enforcement; 1.4.3 Payments for ecosystem services; 1.5 Overview of the book; References; 2. Why conserve primates?
  • Andrew J. Marshall and Serge A. Wich2.1 A basic question; 2.2 Primates promote human health; 2.3 Primates provide benefits to local communities; 2.4 Primates serve key ecological functions; 2.5 Primates provide unique insights into human evolution; 2.6 Primates are of immense biological interest and importance; 2.7 Primates may promote conservation of other taxa; 2.8 Some primates are particularly susceptible to extinction; 2.9 Ethical arguments; 2.10 Complications; 2.10.1 Are primates special?; 2.10.2 Contradictions, complexities, and limitations; 2.10.3 Risky justifications
  • 2.10.4 Opportunity costsReferences; 3. IUCN Red List of Threatened Primate Species; Alison Cotton, Fay Clark, Jean P. Boubli, and Christopher Schwitzer; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species; 3.2.1 Categories and criteria; 3.3 IUCN Species Survival Commission and Primate Specialist Group; 3.4 The dynamism of Red List assessments; 3.5 Trends in primate diversity; 3.6 Trends in primate conservation status; 3.6.1 Trends by region and taxonomic group; 3.7 How Red List data can be utilized in primate conservation; 3.7.1 Case study: lemur conservation; 3.8 Summary; References
  • 4. Species concepts and conservationColin Groves; 4.1 Introduction: what exactly are species?; 4.2 Taxonomic inflation: what does it mean?; 4.3 The newly recognized species: what is their significance? The lemur case; 4.4 Case study: the red colobus; 4.5 The case of the orang-utan; 4.6 Species and the biodiversity crisis; 4.7 Summary; References; 5. Primate conservation genetics at the dawn of conservation genomics; Milena Salgado Lynn, Pierfrancesco Sechi, Lounès Chikhi, and Benoit Goossens; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Conservation/population genetics
  • 5.3 To invade or not to invade . . . that is the question5.3.1 Hair; 5.3.2 Faeces; 5.3.3 Non-invasive samples and genomics; 5.4 Molecular markers: what can they tell us and how can we use them?; 5.5 Conservation genomics and the future; 5.6 Conclusion; References; 6 Primate abundance and distribution: background concepts and methods; Genevieve Campbell, Josephine Head, Jessica Junker, and K.A.I. Nekaris; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Sampling objectives, survey methods, and design; 6.2.1 Sampling considerations; 6.3 Why survey?; 6.3.1 Distribution; 6.3.2 Abundance; 6.3.3 Population trends
Control code
ocn957614778
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 302 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191824067
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)957614778
Label
An introduction to primate conservation, edited by Serge A. Wich, Andrew J. Marshall
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • List of contributors; 1. An introduction to primate conservation; Serge A. Wich and Andrew J. Marshall; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The primate order; 1.3 Threats to primates; 1.3.1 Habitat loss; 1.3.2 Habitat degradation; 1.3.3 Habitat fragmentation; 1.3.4 Drivers of habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation; 1.3.5 Hunting; 1.3.6 Disease; 1.3.7 Climate change; 1.3.8 Roads; 1.4 Approaches to primate conservation; 1.4.1 Protected areas; 1.4.2 Law enforcement; 1.4.3 Payments for ecosystem services; 1.5 Overview of the book; References; 2. Why conserve primates?
  • Andrew J. Marshall and Serge A. Wich2.1 A basic question; 2.2 Primates promote human health; 2.3 Primates provide benefits to local communities; 2.4 Primates serve key ecological functions; 2.5 Primates provide unique insights into human evolution; 2.6 Primates are of immense biological interest and importance; 2.7 Primates may promote conservation of other taxa; 2.8 Some primates are particularly susceptible to extinction; 2.9 Ethical arguments; 2.10 Complications; 2.10.1 Are primates special?; 2.10.2 Contradictions, complexities, and limitations; 2.10.3 Risky justifications
  • 2.10.4 Opportunity costsReferences; 3. IUCN Red List of Threatened Primate Species; Alison Cotton, Fay Clark, Jean P. Boubli, and Christopher Schwitzer; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species; 3.2.1 Categories and criteria; 3.3 IUCN Species Survival Commission and Primate Specialist Group; 3.4 The dynamism of Red List assessments; 3.5 Trends in primate diversity; 3.6 Trends in primate conservation status; 3.6.1 Trends by region and taxonomic group; 3.7 How Red List data can be utilized in primate conservation; 3.7.1 Case study: lemur conservation; 3.8 Summary; References
  • 4. Species concepts and conservationColin Groves; 4.1 Introduction: what exactly are species?; 4.2 Taxonomic inflation: what does it mean?; 4.3 The newly recognized species: what is their significance? The lemur case; 4.4 Case study: the red colobus; 4.5 The case of the orang-utan; 4.6 Species and the biodiversity crisis; 4.7 Summary; References; 5. Primate conservation genetics at the dawn of conservation genomics; Milena Salgado Lynn, Pierfrancesco Sechi, Lounès Chikhi, and Benoit Goossens; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Conservation/population genetics
  • 5.3 To invade or not to invade . . . that is the question5.3.1 Hair; 5.3.2 Faeces; 5.3.3 Non-invasive samples and genomics; 5.4 Molecular markers: what can they tell us and how can we use them?; 5.5 Conservation genomics and the future; 5.6 Conclusion; References; 6 Primate abundance and distribution: background concepts and methods; Genevieve Campbell, Josephine Head, Jessica Junker, and K.A.I. Nekaris; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Sampling objectives, survey methods, and design; 6.2.1 Sampling considerations; 6.3 Why survey?; 6.3.1 Distribution; 6.3.2 Abundance; 6.3.3 Population trends
Control code
ocn957614778
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 302 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191824067
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)957614778

Library Locations

    • InternetBorrow it
      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
Processing Feedback ...