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The Resource Amor technologiae : Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships, Yoni Van Den Eede

Amor technologiae : Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships, Yoni Van Den Eede

Label
Amor technologiae : Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships
Title
Amor technologiae
Title remainder
Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships
Statement of responsibility
Yoni Van Den Eede
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book fuses the fairly new traditions of philosophy of technology and media ecology for the first time in a systematic manner. It specifically does so by interpreting and rephrasing the work of media theorist Marshall McLuhan in the context of a comprehensive philosophy of media. Seen from this perspective, media are not merely channels, forces, or things, as more traditional accounts would have it. They are partially elusive and inherently ambivalent entities to which humans need to meaningfully relate, through the existential project of engaging into, building, and savoring relationships with them
Cataloging source
ERASA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Van Den Eede, Yoni
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Technology
  • Technology
  • Mass media
  • Communication
  • Communication and culture
  • Mass media
  • McLuhan, Marshall
Label
Amor technologiae : Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships, Yoni Van Den Eede
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 479-517)
Contents
  • Visions of Technology: PhilTech and Media Ecology
  • Fourfold Media: The Beloved as the Working ̀Core'
  • 8.1.
  • Objects of Affection
  • 8.2.
  • Steps toward Substance: Metaphor and Formal Cause
  • 8.3.
  • Graham Harman: Object-Oriented Philosophy
  • 8.4.
  • Harman's "Horizontal Broadening" of McLuhan: Against Anthropocentrism
  • 8.5.
  • 1.4.
  • Harman's "Vertical Broadening" of McLuhan: Superposing Relation with Substance
  • 9.
  • Medial Nodes: An Eye for Objects, a Mind for Mediation, a Heart for Humans
  • 9.1.
  • The Relationship Triad
  • 9.2.
  • The Tetrad: Media as Effects
  • 9.3.
  • The Medial Node
  • 9.4.
  • Our Approach: Amor Technologiae
  • The Word, Nature, and Human Construction
  • 9.5.
  • Subversive Anthropocentrism
  • 9.6.
  • Love is Blind; Love Is Happiness Is Suffering
  • pt. II
  • HISTORICAL LEVEL -- LOVE IN THE PLURAL
  • 10.
  • Us in Things: The Lovers' Fight in Technical Form -- or, Material Ideology
  • 10.1.
  • 1.5.
  • If We Are All Extended, Who Is Extended "Most"?
  • 10.2.
  • Andrew Feenberg: ̀Critical Theory of Technology'
  • 10.3.
  • Media Theory and Critical Theory: A Many-Faced Discussion
  • 10.4.
  • The Place of Efficiency: Fitting Feenberg for Media Theory
  • 10.5.
  • Democratization, Change, Revolution
  • 11.
  • Technology and Media: Many-Headed Monsters
  • Mediation-of-Mediation: The "Loves" Multiplied - or, Medial Networks
  • 11.1.
  • Worlds of Mediation
  • 11.2.
  • The Hot-Cool Distinction
  • 11.3.
  • Networks in Flux
  • 11.4.
  • Epochs in the History of Media: Other Perspectives
  • 11.5.
  • 1.6.
  • The Rift: Determinism and "Era Thinking"
  • 12.
  • Politics in Things: Conspiracies of the Beloved -- or, Things' Hidden Agenda
  • 12.1.
  • Things Conspiring to Make It Happen
  • 12.2.
  • Things Matter: The Larger Scale and ̀Hybrid Energy'
  • 12.3.
  • Politics in Things: Ènergy' or Power?
  • 12.4.
  • Outline of This Work
  • Media Evolution: Out of the Kernel, a -New World Is Born
  • 12.5.
  • Evolution vs. Structure: Substances Making for Change
  • 13.
  • A Pan-Medial Cosmology
  • 13.1.
  • À Tale Told by an Idiot...:' "Structural" vs. "Historical"
  • 13.2.
  • The PostPhen-CTT-Media Theory Complex
  • 13.3.
  • pt. 0
  • The Ubiquity of Ideology
  • 13.4.
  • Two Heuristics, Three Components, Two Levels
  • 13.5.
  • A Pan-Medial Cosmology: Finding Our Way
  • pt. III
  • EXISTENTIAL LEVEL -- LIVED LOVE
  • 14.
  • Into Ourselves: Is Narcissus a Narcissist by Design?
  • 14.1.
  • GROUND LEVEL -- WORKERS AND TOOLS
  • Who Are We? / Know Thyself
  • 14.2.
  • Technology and Identity: A Natural Bond
  • 14.3.
  • New Media: Seeing Is Constructing
  • 14.4.
  • New Media: Identities in Crisis
  • 14.5.
  • Four Personality Types
  • 14.6.
  • 2.
  • Narcissism by Design
  • 15.
  • In between Fixity and Adaptation: Home Is Where the Brain Wires
  • 15.1.
  • Can You Relate? At Home with Media
  • 15.2.
  • Home: More Than a Place in Which to Warm One's Bones Beside the Fire
  • 15.3.
  • Heidegger: Home as Nearness to Being
  • 15.4.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Introducing a Protagonist: Marshall McLuhan, "Media Philosopher"
  • The Unfamiliar Familiar, the Unperceived Perceived
  • 15.5.
  • Home: Our Current Brain Structure -- the World
  • 15.6.
  • Home and Technology: The Discipline of Letting Go
  • 16.
  • Living the Object: Collectors by Design
  • 16.1.
  • The Beloved Object and the Collecting Paradigm
  • 16.2.
  • 2.1.
  • What Is Collecting?
  • 16.3.
  • Why Do We Collect?
  • 16.4.
  • From Hardware to Software: "Digital Collecting"
  • 16.5.
  • Digital vs. Traditional Collecting: The Effects of S̀peed-Up'
  • 16.6.
  • Collecting as Way of Coping with the Tensions between Simplicity and Multiplicity
  • 17.
  • The Interpretive Scope
  • Living through the Stasis-Change Dynamic: Learning-as-Dialogue
  • 17.1.
  • The Relationship Triad: A Matter of Tempo
  • 17.2.
  • A Contemporary Complication: Speed-Up
  • 17.3.
  • Conversationalist Existentialism
  • 17.4.
  • Sedimented Speed: Two Tales
  • 17.5.
  • 2.2.
  • Learning-in-Conversation: Finding a Tempo
  • Concluding Remarks On Love
  • 18.
  • Concluding Remarks on Love
  • 18.1.
  • One Last Look in the Rear-View Mirror
  • 18.2.
  • Love as Technology
  • 18.3.
  • ̀Both Sides, Now': A Final Self-Reflexive Moment
  • Enter McLuhan, Philosopher of Blindness
  • 2.3.
  • ̀The Medium Is...': The Thing that Eludes Us
  • 2.4.
  • McLuhan's Sensualism
  • 2.5.
  • 1.
  • Criticisms
  • 2.6.
  • What Remains
  • 3.
  • ̀Love Is Bund': Blindness in Relation to "What We Get"
  • 3.1.
  • The "Result" of Love
  • 3.2.
  • Blindness and Transparency
  • 3.3.
  • Introduction
  • Transparency of Use
  • 3.4.
  • Transparency of Context
  • 3.5.
  • Two Levels of Blindness
  • 4.
  • Love Is Happiness Is Suffering: Ambivalence in Relation to "What We Want"
  • 4.1.
  • Reasons for Love
  • 4.2.
  • 1.1.
  • Two Axes
  • 4.3.
  • Control
  • 4.4.
  • Contact
  • 4.5.
  • Copy: The "Human Fit" of Technology
  • 4.6.
  • Straddling Ambivalences
  • 5.
  • The Dream and the Waking Up
  • Revisiting a Protagonist: A Prelude to Stories of Illusion and Loss, One and Many, Stasis and Change
  • 5.1.
  • McLuhan, again
  • 5.2.
  • The "Flip Side" of the Tetrad: The Loss We Cannot Lose
  • 5.3.
  • Bias: The Blindness We Cannot See (nor Unsee)
  • 5.4.
  • ̀To the Blind, All Things Are Sudden': Effects and Understanding
  • 5.5.
  • 1.2.
  • Levels of Blindness and Ambivalence, Foci of Temporary Concern
  • pt. I
  • STRUCTURAL LEVEL -- LOVE IN THE SINGULAR
  • 6.
  • Out of Ourselves: The Lover as the One Who Is Extended
  • 6.1.
  • Us, Humans: Lovers of Technology
  • 6.2.
  • The Extension Idea: A Classic
  • 6.3.
  • Approaching Technology: Theory and Praxis
  • The Specificity of McLuhan's Extension Idea: Blindness and Ambivalence
  • 6.4.
  • We Reach out into the Environment, the Environment Reaches into Us
  • 6.5.
  • The Extension Idea Today
  • 6.6.
  • What Is "Man"?
  • 7.
  • The In-between: The Love as Constitutive-Transformative Process
  • 7.1.
  • 1.3.
  • Love Itself: The Human-Technology Relation
  • 7.2.
  • Media and Mediation
  • 7.3.
  • ̀The Meaning of Meaning Is Relationship': Heidegger, Bateson
  • 7.4.
  • Postphenomenology: The Mediation Constitutes the Mediators
  • 7.5.
  • Myth: The Moment at Which All Is
  • 8.
Control code
ocn825746461
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
517 p.
Isbn
9789057181870
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)825746461
Label
Amor technologiae : Marshall McLuhan as philosopher of technology : toward a philosophy of human-media relationships, Yoni Van Den Eede
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 479-517)
Contents
  • Visions of Technology: PhilTech and Media Ecology
  • Fourfold Media: The Beloved as the Working ̀Core'
  • 8.1.
  • Objects of Affection
  • 8.2.
  • Steps toward Substance: Metaphor and Formal Cause
  • 8.3.
  • Graham Harman: Object-Oriented Philosophy
  • 8.4.
  • Harman's "Horizontal Broadening" of McLuhan: Against Anthropocentrism
  • 8.5.
  • 1.4.
  • Harman's "Vertical Broadening" of McLuhan: Superposing Relation with Substance
  • 9.
  • Medial Nodes: An Eye for Objects, a Mind for Mediation, a Heart for Humans
  • 9.1.
  • The Relationship Triad
  • 9.2.
  • The Tetrad: Media as Effects
  • 9.3.
  • The Medial Node
  • 9.4.
  • Our Approach: Amor Technologiae
  • The Word, Nature, and Human Construction
  • 9.5.
  • Subversive Anthropocentrism
  • 9.6.
  • Love is Blind; Love Is Happiness Is Suffering
  • pt. II
  • HISTORICAL LEVEL -- LOVE IN THE PLURAL
  • 10.
  • Us in Things: The Lovers' Fight in Technical Form -- or, Material Ideology
  • 10.1.
  • 1.5.
  • If We Are All Extended, Who Is Extended "Most"?
  • 10.2.
  • Andrew Feenberg: ̀Critical Theory of Technology'
  • 10.3.
  • Media Theory and Critical Theory: A Many-Faced Discussion
  • 10.4.
  • The Place of Efficiency: Fitting Feenberg for Media Theory
  • 10.5.
  • Democratization, Change, Revolution
  • 11.
  • Technology and Media: Many-Headed Monsters
  • Mediation-of-Mediation: The "Loves" Multiplied - or, Medial Networks
  • 11.1.
  • Worlds of Mediation
  • 11.2.
  • The Hot-Cool Distinction
  • 11.3.
  • Networks in Flux
  • 11.4.
  • Epochs in the History of Media: Other Perspectives
  • 11.5.
  • 1.6.
  • The Rift: Determinism and "Era Thinking"
  • 12.
  • Politics in Things: Conspiracies of the Beloved -- or, Things' Hidden Agenda
  • 12.1.
  • Things Conspiring to Make It Happen
  • 12.2.
  • Things Matter: The Larger Scale and ̀Hybrid Energy'
  • 12.3.
  • Politics in Things: Ènergy' or Power?
  • 12.4.
  • Outline of This Work
  • Media Evolution: Out of the Kernel, a -New World Is Born
  • 12.5.
  • Evolution vs. Structure: Substances Making for Change
  • 13.
  • A Pan-Medial Cosmology
  • 13.1.
  • À Tale Told by an Idiot...:' "Structural" vs. "Historical"
  • 13.2.
  • The PostPhen-CTT-Media Theory Complex
  • 13.3.
  • pt. 0
  • The Ubiquity of Ideology
  • 13.4.
  • Two Heuristics, Three Components, Two Levels
  • 13.5.
  • A Pan-Medial Cosmology: Finding Our Way
  • pt. III
  • EXISTENTIAL LEVEL -- LIVED LOVE
  • 14.
  • Into Ourselves: Is Narcissus a Narcissist by Design?
  • 14.1.
  • GROUND LEVEL -- WORKERS AND TOOLS
  • Who Are We? / Know Thyself
  • 14.2.
  • Technology and Identity: A Natural Bond
  • 14.3.
  • New Media: Seeing Is Constructing
  • 14.4.
  • New Media: Identities in Crisis
  • 14.5.
  • Four Personality Types
  • 14.6.
  • 2.
  • Narcissism by Design
  • 15.
  • In between Fixity and Adaptation: Home Is Where the Brain Wires
  • 15.1.
  • Can You Relate? At Home with Media
  • 15.2.
  • Home: More Than a Place in Which to Warm One's Bones Beside the Fire
  • 15.3.
  • Heidegger: Home as Nearness to Being
  • 15.4.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Introducing a Protagonist: Marshall McLuhan, "Media Philosopher"
  • The Unfamiliar Familiar, the Unperceived Perceived
  • 15.5.
  • Home: Our Current Brain Structure -- the World
  • 15.6.
  • Home and Technology: The Discipline of Letting Go
  • 16.
  • Living the Object: Collectors by Design
  • 16.1.
  • The Beloved Object and the Collecting Paradigm
  • 16.2.
  • 2.1.
  • What Is Collecting?
  • 16.3.
  • Why Do We Collect?
  • 16.4.
  • From Hardware to Software: "Digital Collecting"
  • 16.5.
  • Digital vs. Traditional Collecting: The Effects of S̀peed-Up'
  • 16.6.
  • Collecting as Way of Coping with the Tensions between Simplicity and Multiplicity
  • 17.
  • The Interpretive Scope
  • Living through the Stasis-Change Dynamic: Learning-as-Dialogue
  • 17.1.
  • The Relationship Triad: A Matter of Tempo
  • 17.2.
  • A Contemporary Complication: Speed-Up
  • 17.3.
  • Conversationalist Existentialism
  • 17.4.
  • Sedimented Speed: Two Tales
  • 17.5.
  • 2.2.
  • Learning-in-Conversation: Finding a Tempo
  • Concluding Remarks On Love
  • 18.
  • Concluding Remarks on Love
  • 18.1.
  • One Last Look in the Rear-View Mirror
  • 18.2.
  • Love as Technology
  • 18.3.
  • ̀Both Sides, Now': A Final Self-Reflexive Moment
  • Enter McLuhan, Philosopher of Blindness
  • 2.3.
  • ̀The Medium Is...': The Thing that Eludes Us
  • 2.4.
  • McLuhan's Sensualism
  • 2.5.
  • 1.
  • Criticisms
  • 2.6.
  • What Remains
  • 3.
  • ̀Love Is Bund': Blindness in Relation to "What We Get"
  • 3.1.
  • The "Result" of Love
  • 3.2.
  • Blindness and Transparency
  • 3.3.
  • Introduction
  • Transparency of Use
  • 3.4.
  • Transparency of Context
  • 3.5.
  • Two Levels of Blindness
  • 4.
  • Love Is Happiness Is Suffering: Ambivalence in Relation to "What We Want"
  • 4.1.
  • Reasons for Love
  • 4.2.
  • 1.1.
  • Two Axes
  • 4.3.
  • Control
  • 4.4.
  • Contact
  • 4.5.
  • Copy: The "Human Fit" of Technology
  • 4.6.
  • Straddling Ambivalences
  • 5.
  • The Dream and the Waking Up
  • Revisiting a Protagonist: A Prelude to Stories of Illusion and Loss, One and Many, Stasis and Change
  • 5.1.
  • McLuhan, again
  • 5.2.
  • The "Flip Side" of the Tetrad: The Loss We Cannot Lose
  • 5.3.
  • Bias: The Blindness We Cannot See (nor Unsee)
  • 5.4.
  • ̀To the Blind, All Things Are Sudden': Effects and Understanding
  • 5.5.
  • 1.2.
  • Levels of Blindness and Ambivalence, Foci of Temporary Concern
  • pt. I
  • STRUCTURAL LEVEL -- LOVE IN THE SINGULAR
  • 6.
  • Out of Ourselves: The Lover as the One Who Is Extended
  • 6.1.
  • Us, Humans: Lovers of Technology
  • 6.2.
  • The Extension Idea: A Classic
  • 6.3.
  • Approaching Technology: Theory and Praxis
  • The Specificity of McLuhan's Extension Idea: Blindness and Ambivalence
  • 6.4.
  • We Reach out into the Environment, the Environment Reaches into Us
  • 6.5.
  • The Extension Idea Today
  • 6.6.
  • What Is "Man"?
  • 7.
  • The In-between: The Love as Constitutive-Transformative Process
  • 7.1.
  • 1.3.
  • Love Itself: The Human-Technology Relation
  • 7.2.
  • Media and Mediation
  • 7.3.
  • ̀The Meaning of Meaning Is Relationship': Heidegger, Bateson
  • 7.4.
  • Postphenomenology: The Mediation Constitutes the Mediators
  • 7.5.
  • Myth: The Moment at Which All Is
  • 8.
Control code
ocn825746461
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
517 p.
Isbn
9789057181870
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)825746461

Library Locations

    • Manawatū LibraryBorrow it
      Tennent Drive, Palmerston North, Palmerston North, 4472, NZ
      -40.385340 175.617349
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