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The Resource Advances in thermal energy storage systems : methods and applications, edited by Luisa F. Cabeza

Advances in thermal energy storage systems : methods and applications, edited by Luisa F. Cabeza

Label
Advances in thermal energy storage systems : methods and applications
Title
Advances in thermal energy storage systems
Title remainder
methods and applications
Statement of responsibility
edited by Luisa F. Cabeza
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Thermal energy storage (TES) technologies store thermal energy (both heat and cold) for later use as required, rather than at the time of production. They are therefore important counterparts to various intermittent renewable energy generation methods and also provide a way of valorising waste process heat and reducing the energy demand of buildings. This book provides an authoritative overview of this key area. Part one reviews sensible heat storage technologies. Part two covers latent and thermochemical heat storage respectively. The final section addresses applications in heating and energy
Member of
Dewey number
621.402/8
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1967-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Cabeza, Luisa F.
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing series in energy
Series volume
number 66
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Heat storage
  • Heat storage devices
  • Buildings
Label
Advances in thermal energy storage systems : methods and applications, edited by Luisa F. Cabeza
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Cover; Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems: Methods and Applications; Copyright; Contents; List of contributors; Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy; Preface; 1 Introduction to thermal energy storage (TES) systems; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Basic thermodynamics of energy storage; 1.3 Overview of system types; 1.4 Environmental impact and energy savings produced; 1.5 Conclusions; Acknowledgements; References; Part One Sensible heat storage systems; 2 Using water for heat storage in thermal energy storage (TES); 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Principles of sensible heat storage systems involving water2.3 Advances in the use of water for heat storage; 2.4 Future trends; 2.5 Sources of further information and advice; References; 3 Using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media inthermal energy storage (TES) systems; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Principles of heat storage systems using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media; 3.3 Advances in molten salt storage; 3.4 Advances in other liquid sensible storage media; 3.5 Future trends; 3.6 Sources of further information and advice; Acknowledgements; References
  • 4 Using concrete and other solid storage media in thermal energystorage (TES) systems4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Principles of heat storage in solid media; 4.3 State-of-the-art regenerator-type storage; 4.4 Advances in the use of solid storage media for heat storage; References; 5 The use of aquifers as thermal energy storage (TES) systems; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Thermal sources; 5.3 Aquifier thermal energy storage (ATES); 5.4 Thermal and geophysical aspects; 5.5 ATES design; 5.6 ATES cooling only case study: Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
  • 5.7 ATES district heating and cooling with heat pumps case study: Eindhoven University of Technology5.8 ATES heating and cooling with de-icing case study: ATES plant at Stockholm Arlanda Airport; 5.9 Conclusion; Acknowledgements; Bibliography; 6 The use of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 System integration of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES); 6.3 Investigation and design of BTES construction sites; 6.4 Construction of borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) and BTES; 6.5 Examples of BTES; 6.6 Conclusion and future trends; References
  • 7 Analysis, modeling and simulation of underground thermalenergy storage (UTES) systems7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system; 7.3 Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system; 7.4 FEFLOW as a tool for simulating underground thermal energy storage (UTES); 7.5 Applications; References; Appendix: Nomenclature; Part Two Latent heat storage systems; 8 Using ice and snow in thermal energy storage systems; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 Principles of thermal energy storage systems using snow and ice; 8.3 Design and implementation of thermal energy storage using snow
Control code
ocn898424147
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xviii, 592 pages .)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781782420965
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)898424147
Label
Advances in thermal energy storage systems : methods and applications, edited by Luisa F. Cabeza
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Cover; Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems: Methods and Applications; Copyright; Contents; List of contributors; Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy; Preface; 1 Introduction to thermal energy storage (TES) systems; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Basic thermodynamics of energy storage; 1.3 Overview of system types; 1.4 Environmental impact and energy savings produced; 1.5 Conclusions; Acknowledgements; References; Part One Sensible heat storage systems; 2 Using water for heat storage in thermal energy storage (TES); 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Principles of sensible heat storage systems involving water2.3 Advances in the use of water for heat storage; 2.4 Future trends; 2.5 Sources of further information and advice; References; 3 Using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media inthermal energy storage (TES) systems; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Principles of heat storage systems using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media; 3.3 Advances in molten salt storage; 3.4 Advances in other liquid sensible storage media; 3.5 Future trends; 3.6 Sources of further information and advice; Acknowledgements; References
  • 4 Using concrete and other solid storage media in thermal energystorage (TES) systems4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Principles of heat storage in solid media; 4.3 State-of-the-art regenerator-type storage; 4.4 Advances in the use of solid storage media for heat storage; References; 5 The use of aquifers as thermal energy storage (TES) systems; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Thermal sources; 5.3 Aquifier thermal energy storage (ATES); 5.4 Thermal and geophysical aspects; 5.5 ATES design; 5.6 ATES cooling only case study: Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
  • 5.7 ATES district heating and cooling with heat pumps case study: Eindhoven University of Technology5.8 ATES heating and cooling with de-icing case study: ATES plant at Stockholm Arlanda Airport; 5.9 Conclusion; Acknowledgements; Bibliography; 6 The use of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 System integration of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES); 6.3 Investigation and design of BTES construction sites; 6.4 Construction of borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) and BTES; 6.5 Examples of BTES; 6.6 Conclusion and future trends; References
  • 7 Analysis, modeling and simulation of underground thermalenergy storage (UTES) systems7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system; 7.3 Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system; 7.4 FEFLOW as a tool for simulating underground thermal energy storage (UTES); 7.5 Applications; References; Appendix: Nomenclature; Part Two Latent heat storage systems; 8 Using ice and snow in thermal energy storage systems; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 Principles of thermal energy storage systems using snow and ice; 8.3 Design and implementation of thermal energy storage using snow
Control code
ocn898424147
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xviii, 592 pages .)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781782420965
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)898424147

Library Locations

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      Albany, Auckland, 0632, NZ
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