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The Resource A theory of phonological features, San Duanmu

A theory of phonological features, San Duanmu

Label
A theory of phonological features
Title
A theory of phonological features
Statement of responsibility
San Duanmu
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This title outlines a system of phonological features that is minimally sufficient to distinguish all consonants and vowels in the languages of the world. It focuses on a straightforward procedure to interpret empirical data and reveals a surprisingly simple feature system whereby a two-way contrast for each feature proves sufficient
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Duanmu, San
Dewey number
414
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Oxford linguistics
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Phonetics
Label
A theory of phonological features, San Duanmu
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-167) and indexes
Contents
  • Cover; A Theory of Phonological Features; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations and terms used; Commonly used abbreviations; 1: Introduction; 1.1 Sounds and time; 1.1.1 Segmentation of speech; 1.1.2 Granularity of segmentation; 1.1.3 Defining sounds by time; 1.1.4 Phonemes and allophones; 1.2 Features and contrast; 1.2.1 Contrast; 1.2.2 Sound classes; 1.2.3 Phonetic properties; 1.2.4 Summary; 1.3 Cross-language comparison; 1.4 Adequacy of available data; 1.5 Summary; 2: Method; 2.1 Data; 2.2 Guiding principles; 2.2.1 Principle of Contrast; 2.2.2 Maxima First
  • 2.2.3 Known Feature First2.2.4 Summary; 2.3 Interpreting transcription errors; 2.4 Searching for maxima; 2.5 Interpreting exceptions; 2.6 Summary; 3: Vowel contrasts; 3.1 Vowels in UPSID; 3.1.1 Basic vowels; 3.1.2 Extra-short (overshort) vowels; 3.1.3 Pharyngeal vowels; 3.1.4 Other vowels; 3.2 Vowels in P-base; 3.2.1 Basic vowels; 3.2.2 Pharyngeal vowels; 3.2.3 Creaky vs. glottalized vowels; 3.2.4 Voiceless vowels; 3.2.5 Extra-short and extra-long vowels; 3.2.6 Other vowels; 3.3 Summary; 4: Vowel height; 4.1 Motivations for a two-height system; 4.2 Basic vowels in UPSID
  • 4.3 Basic vowels in P-base4.4 Evidence from sound classes; 4.4.1 [tense] in English; 4.4.2 [+low] in P-base; 4.5 Step raising; 4.6 Summary; 5: Consonant contrasts; 5.1 Consonants in UPSID; 5.1.1 Voiced glottal stop and pharyngeal stop; 5.1.2 Dental, dental/alveolar, and alveolar places; 5.1.3 Sibilant vs. non-sibilant fricatives; 5.1.4 Taps and flaps; 5.1.5 Lateral fricatives vs. lateral approximants; 5.1.6 ̀̀r-sound ́́and ̀̀approximant [r];́́ 5.1.7 Summary; 5.2 Consonants in P-base; 5.2.1 Basic consonants; 5.2.2 Consonants with a ̀̀voiceless ́́diacritic; 5.2.3 Other consonants; 5.3 Summary
  • 6: A feature system6.1 Previous proposals; 6.1.1 Jakobson etal. (1952); 6.1.2 Chomsky and Halle (1968); 6.1.3 Clements (1985); 6.1.4 Clements and Hume (1995); 6.1.5 Browman and Goldstein (1989); 6.1.6 Halle (1995; 2003); 6.1.7 Ladefoged (2007); 6.1.8 Summary; 6.2 A new feature system; 6.2.1 Articulators and gestures; 6.2.2 Interpreting manner features; 6.2.3 Interpreting place features; 6.2.4 Other features; 6.3 Representing vowels; 6.4 Representing basic consonants; 6.5 Representing tones; 6.6 Feature specification (underspecification); 6.7 Phonetic variation of features; 6.8 Summary
  • 7: Complex sounds7.1 Compatibility of feature values: The No Contour Principle; 7.2 Complex sounds whose features are compatible; 7.2.1 Affricates; 7.2.2 CG (consonant-glide) units; 7.2.3 CL (consonant-liquid) units; 7.3 Complex sounds whose features are incompatible; 7.3.1 Contour tones; 7.3.2 Pre- and post-nasalized consonants; 7.4 Non-pulmonic sounds; 7.4.1 Clicks; 7.4.2 Ejectives; 7.4.3 Implosives; 7.4.4 Two-sound analysis; 7.5 Summary; 8: Concluding remarks; 8.1 How many distinct sounds are there?; 8.2 How many sounds does a language need?; 8.3 Where do features come from?; References
Control code
ocn945735938
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191818004
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)945735938
Label
A theory of phonological features, San Duanmu
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-167) and indexes
Contents
  • Cover; A Theory of Phonological Features; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations and terms used; Commonly used abbreviations; 1: Introduction; 1.1 Sounds and time; 1.1.1 Segmentation of speech; 1.1.2 Granularity of segmentation; 1.1.3 Defining sounds by time; 1.1.4 Phonemes and allophones; 1.2 Features and contrast; 1.2.1 Contrast; 1.2.2 Sound classes; 1.2.3 Phonetic properties; 1.2.4 Summary; 1.3 Cross-language comparison; 1.4 Adequacy of available data; 1.5 Summary; 2: Method; 2.1 Data; 2.2 Guiding principles; 2.2.1 Principle of Contrast; 2.2.2 Maxima First
  • 2.2.3 Known Feature First2.2.4 Summary; 2.3 Interpreting transcription errors; 2.4 Searching for maxima; 2.5 Interpreting exceptions; 2.6 Summary; 3: Vowel contrasts; 3.1 Vowels in UPSID; 3.1.1 Basic vowels; 3.1.2 Extra-short (overshort) vowels; 3.1.3 Pharyngeal vowels; 3.1.4 Other vowels; 3.2 Vowels in P-base; 3.2.1 Basic vowels; 3.2.2 Pharyngeal vowels; 3.2.3 Creaky vs. glottalized vowels; 3.2.4 Voiceless vowels; 3.2.5 Extra-short and extra-long vowels; 3.2.6 Other vowels; 3.3 Summary; 4: Vowel height; 4.1 Motivations for a two-height system; 4.2 Basic vowels in UPSID
  • 4.3 Basic vowels in P-base4.4 Evidence from sound classes; 4.4.1 [tense] in English; 4.4.2 [+low] in P-base; 4.5 Step raising; 4.6 Summary; 5: Consonant contrasts; 5.1 Consonants in UPSID; 5.1.1 Voiced glottal stop and pharyngeal stop; 5.1.2 Dental, dental/alveolar, and alveolar places; 5.1.3 Sibilant vs. non-sibilant fricatives; 5.1.4 Taps and flaps; 5.1.5 Lateral fricatives vs. lateral approximants; 5.1.6 ̀̀r-sound ́́and ̀̀approximant [r];́́ 5.1.7 Summary; 5.2 Consonants in P-base; 5.2.1 Basic consonants; 5.2.2 Consonants with a ̀̀voiceless ́́diacritic; 5.2.3 Other consonants; 5.3 Summary
  • 6: A feature system6.1 Previous proposals; 6.1.1 Jakobson etal. (1952); 6.1.2 Chomsky and Halle (1968); 6.1.3 Clements (1985); 6.1.4 Clements and Hume (1995); 6.1.5 Browman and Goldstein (1989); 6.1.6 Halle (1995; 2003); 6.1.7 Ladefoged (2007); 6.1.8 Summary; 6.2 A new feature system; 6.2.1 Articulators and gestures; 6.2.2 Interpreting manner features; 6.2.3 Interpreting place features; 6.2.4 Other features; 6.3 Representing vowels; 6.4 Representing basic consonants; 6.5 Representing tones; 6.6 Feature specification (underspecification); 6.7 Phonetic variation of features; 6.8 Summary
  • 7: Complex sounds7.1 Compatibility of feature values: The No Contour Principle; 7.2 Complex sounds whose features are compatible; 7.2.1 Affricates; 7.2.2 CG (consonant-glide) units; 7.2.3 CL (consonant-liquid) units; 7.3 Complex sounds whose features are incompatible; 7.3.1 Contour tones; 7.3.2 Pre- and post-nasalized consonants; 7.4 Non-pulmonic sounds; 7.4.1 Clicks; 7.4.2 Ejectives; 7.4.3 Implosives; 7.4.4 Two-sound analysis; 7.5 Summary; 8: Concluding remarks; 8.1 How many distinct sounds are there?; 8.2 How many sounds does a language need?; 8.3 Where do features come from?; References
Control code
ocn945735938
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780191818004
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)945735938

Library Locations

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